#BlackKidsMatter: Police in Ohio Fractured Ribs, Jaw of 12-year-old Black Girl at a Local Pool

ohio-cop-pool-arrestIt has only been a few weeks since video footage emerged of a pool party in McKinney, Texas where Black teens were violently apprehended, intimidated, and brutalized by White police officers and community residents. While some would like to believe that these incidents are few and far in between, the truth is, they happen every day. This time, a 12-year-old girl, reportedly, suffered broken ribs and a fractured jaw.

According to the Daily Beast, Krystal Dixon dropped off her children, nieces, and nephews at a local pool in Fairfield, Ohio. She quickly received a phone call indicating that one of the children did not have their swimsuit. Apparently, the child, her nephew, proceeded to swim in the community pool anyway. She agreed to bring the swimwear back to the child. However, reports indicate that the issue escalated to the point that staff members at the Fairfield Aquatic Center asked the family to leave. When Dixon returned to collect the children, she says that police officers began to pursue them, taking out their handcuffs. At this point, what seemed like a minor issue turned into a serious altercation of violence and physical confrontation.

Soon, police officers used pepper spray on the tweens and teens and slammed a 12-year-old girl against a police vehicle. The Black teens can be seen crying on camera after being pepper sprayed, screaming for the police officers to stop grabbing and pulling them. Krystal Dixon is six months pregnant. It is clear from the video that she is with child. However, that still wasn’t reason enough for police officers to treat her with respect and civility. Dixon believes the officers used more force than necessary especially since the family was neither armed nor violent.

The police authorities offer a different perspective of the events that day. They claim that the teenagers refused to leave. Not only that, they say the kids became “verbally aggresive and belligerent.” They have even indicated that the 12-year-old girl physically assaulted an officer. Unsurprisingly, Fairfield Police officers deny any wrongdoing. They disagree with the family’s claims of excessive force and are standing by the actions in the footage. Some of the other patrons at the pool are standing in support of the police. However, pool staff members and local religious leaders suggest the arrests were race related.

Like the McKinney incident, there were civilian White males who got involved with the police brutality against the Black teens in the video. This suggests that, somehow, there is an unwritten rule in modern law enforcement that random White men have jurisdiction in arrests of Black kids, especially Black girls. How these men are permitted to physically touch the bodies of Black children with impunity is mind-boggling. Eerily, cops don’t even seem the least bit concerned with these White men inserting themselves in police business.

Besides being entirely enraging, this video highlights how public spaces in the United States are continually policed. Not only are officers ready at all moments to persecute young Black people, pool staff members and patrons seem more than obliged to assist in reprimanding and eliminating young Black people no matter how small the offense. For young Black people, merely existing in public could result in public humiliation, isolation, or, worse, death.

While it is great news that no one was killed in this event, it still shows how fragile Black life is in this country. And, it proves we have so much more work to do to ensure that #BlackKidsMatter in all public spaces.

Photo Credit: Youtube

 

Jenn M. Jackson is the Editorial Assistant for The Black Youth Project. She is also the Editor-in-Chief and co-founder of Water Cooler Convos, a politics, news, and culture webmag for bourgie Black nerds. For more about her, tweet her at @JennMJack or visit her website at jennmjackson.com.

A Call to Talk About Things That Actually Matter To Black Folks

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By Victoria Massie

I’m trying to do a better job of not writing when I’m heated. Much of this rooted in a deep sense of self-care. For this reason I ask that people redirect their energies toward something more productive. Rachel Dolezal is not novel. Every aspect of how she hit the stage, of how we know her name is based on the culmination of all the many ways white supremacy operates and has sustained itself since this country’s inception.

We have even found ourselves festering on each other’s flesh, conflating gender with racial identity, two modes of inscribing power inequalities into our everyday lives, but quite distinctly. While both are socially constructed, they are done so quite differently. You do not inherit a gender from your parents, or else you would only need one, and we would have very little reason to do the serious work of policing our presentation through our style and actions that gender inequalities requires. Not to mention all of the ways that race often erases the cis-gendered hierarchy. How often are black women and girls treated like men, not as equally women and girls as their white counterparts? This would a classic moments for scholars to revisit Hortense Spillers’ “Mama’s Baby, Papa’s Maybe: An American Grammar Book.”

Race doesn’t work like that. While there is no biological basis, biology has served as material manipulated to give salience to phenotype and consequently substantiate the modes of violence done in its name, and ensure them as inheritable. Rachel is not passing; she is embodying blackface, a living case of plagiarism, because passing has NEVER been fluid; it has never been a move from one end to another without cutting off some part of yourself for your “benefit.” That choice has never been as boundless for actually black people as it presents itself for this white woman. But beyond this, this conflation of gender and race, employs erasure by further erasing people who are already living in a very vulnerable state of erasability: our black trans siblings. We are sitting here debating ourselves for her, all the while draining ourselves, eating each other alive on the way.

My hope is that for self-care, put your energies toward talking about things that actually matter to black people: anything from McKinney; to Arnesha Bowers; to the 12 year old girl in Cincinnati who just had her neck broken by a cop while playing at a pool; talk about our Haitian siblings who have become stateless; to the young black girl who just earned over $3 million in scholarships.

For all the people who are actually black, we know that our lives are not debatable. That’s the core value of #BlackLivesMatter, or to #SayHerName. We need each other, and every second we continue to waste on her makes it all the more difficult for us to do the work to ensure our liberation, something most certainly will not come from white people who do not respect boundaries, who cross them to be us (shout out to Audre Lorde’s essay “Learning from the 60s”).

For all the black women and black girls out there, maybe the point today for #WCW is to love on yourself.

Photo: Generic/gtpete63

 Victoria Massie is an anthropologist and writer. For information, you can find her on victoriammassie.com.

New Series Shows the Beauty of Black Queer and Transgender Love

Black queer and trans* folks are often excluded from mainstream ideals about love and romance. Their deviation from the White heteropatriarchal “norm” means that many folks in these communities rarely see images of themselves reflcted back on the silver screen, in TV series’, or in other media in popular culture. That’s why NBC’s new series “Living Color: Love is Revolutionary When You’re Black & Transgender,” a first entry in the “NBCBLK “Love is Revolutionary” series is so timely and necessary.

In a world where trans folks are still murdered for merely existing, this series dares to spotlight the beauty in these loving relationships. While this will not cure all the issues many folks in the United States have had historically, and still have presently, with queer and trans* love, it is definitely a beautiful expression of visibility for individuals who are left out of the notion of love altogether.

Photo Credit: YouTube/NBCNews/Still

 

Jenn M. Jackson is the Editorial Assistant for The Black Youth Project. She is also the Editor-in-Chief and co-founder of Water Cooler Convos, a politics, news, and culture webmag for bourgie Black nerds. For more about her, tweet her at @JennMJack or visit her website at jennmjackson.com.

Poet’s Explanation of “Black Privilege” Gives an Emotional Account of Black Life

A powerful poem by Crystal Valentine, student at NYU and activist, has been captivating watchers since it was posted on YouTube last week. Valentine performed the poem at the 2015 College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational where her team won the competition.

In the poem, she gives a very raw and emotional account of Black life in America today noting how young, unarmed men like Trayvon Martin navigate  a world where they are always expected to conform to anti-Blackness. Similarly, she notes that young Black girls  face  a similar fate even though many people fail to admit it.

She says, “Black Privilege is always having to be the strong one, is having a crowbar for a spine…Black Privilege is being so unique that not even God will look like you.”

Valentine’s account is not only meaningful, it accurately depicts the conflicted nature of Black citizenship in America in the 21st  century.

Jenn M. Jackson is the Editorial Assistant for The Black Youth Project. She is also the Editor-in-Chief and co-founder of Water Cooler Convos, a politics, news, and culture webmag for bourgie Black nerds. For more about her, tweet her at @JennMJack or visit her website at jennmjackson.com.

Rachel Dolezal Steps Down From NAACP Post

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On Monday, Rachel Dolezag announced via the Spokance NAACP Facebook page that she would be stepping down from her post as president of the chapter.

Dear Executive Committee and NAACP Members,

It is a true honor to serve in the racial and social justice movement here in Spokane and across the nation. Many issues face us now that drive at the theme of urgency. Police brutality, biased curriculum in schools, economic disenfranchisement, health inequities, and a lack of pro-justice political representation are among the concerns at the forefront of the current administration of the Spokane NAACP. And yet, the dialogue has unexpectedly shifted internationally to my personal identity in the context of defining race and ethnicity.

I have waited in deference while others expressed their feelings, beliefs, confusions and even conclusions – absent the full story. I am consistently committed to empowering marginalized voices and believe that many individuals have been heard in the last hours and days that would not otherwise have had a platform to weigh in on this important discussion. Additionally, I have always deferred to the state and national NAACP leadership and offer my sincere gratitude for their unwavering support of my leadership through this unexpected firestorm.

While challenging the construct of race is at the core of evolving human consciousness, we can NOT afford to lose sight of the five Game Changers (Criminal Justice & Public Safety, Health & Healthcare, Education, Economic Sustainability, and Voting Rights & Political Representation) that affect millions, often with a life or death outcome. The movement is larger than a moment in time or a single person’s story, and I hope that everyone offers their robust support of the Journey for Justice campaign that the NAACP launches today!

I am delighted that so many organizations and individuals have supported and collaborated with the Spokane NAACP under my leadership to grow this branch into one of the healthiest in the nation in 5 short months. In the eye of this current storm, I can see that a separation of family and organizational outcomes is in the best interest of the NAACP.

It is with complete allegiance to the cause of racial and social justice and the NAACP that I step aside from the Presidency and pass the baton to my Vice President, Naima Quarles-Burnley. It is my hope that by securing a beautiful office for the organization in the heart of downtown, bringing the local branch into financial compliance, catalyzing committees to do strategic work in the five Game Changer issues, launching community forums, putting the membership on a fast climb, and helping many individuals find the legal, financial and practical support needed to fight race-based discrimination, I have positioned the Spokane NAACP to buttress this transition.

Please know I will never stop fighting for human rights and will do everything in my power to help and assist, whether it means stepping up or stepping down, because this is not about me. It’s about justice. This is not me quitting; this is a continuum. It’s about moving the cause of human rights and the Black Liberation Movement along the continuum from Resistance to Chattel Slavery to Abolition to Defiance of Jim Crow to the building of Black Wall Street to the Civil Rights and Black Power Movement to the #‎BlackLivesMatter movement and into a future of self-determination and empowerment.

With much love and a commitment to always fight for what is right and good in this world,

Rachel Dolezal

Photo: Rachel Dolezal

15 Mysteries We’d Like the Black Twitter Detective Agency to Solve

By Jayy Dodd

But it’s really none of our business…

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1. Raven-Symoné and the Case of the Translucent American.

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2. Where were you when Cash Money took over the 99 & the 2000

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3. How to know if you are “fahn”?

4. Did Rachel Dolezal try to ‘Single Lightskin Female’ Melissa Harris Perry? 

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5. How did talking loud run up the light bill?

6. Is Tidal a product of the Illuminati?

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7. How did Don Lemon become America’s Black Friend?

8. Was Talenti created by the CIA to take Black dollars?

9. If real men give birth to themselves, is Dame Dash an amoeba?

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 10. Is Shea Butter the new Black card?

 11. Which ancestor has kept Pharrell looking the same for 17 years?

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 12. Why isn’t everyday Black Out Day?

 13. How does one “fetty wap”? 

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 14. Dance…soiree? 

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15. Who imports all this tea we are sipping?

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Photos: Giphy

Jay Dodd is a writer and performance artist based in Boston, originally from Los Angeles. After recently graduating Tufts University, Jay has organized vigils and protests locally for Black Lives Matter: Boston. When not in the streets, Jay has contributed to Huffington Post and is currently a contributing writer for VSNotebook.com, based in London. Jay Dodd is active on social media celebrating Blackness, interrogating masculinity, and complicating queerness. His poetic and performance work speaks to queer Black masculinity and afrofuturism.