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Xenia Rubinos Brings Afro-Latina Fire With New Album ‘Black Terry Cat’

By: Sam Fleming

Xenia Rubinos is a singer, occasional rapper, and multi-instrumentalist from Hartford, Connecticut. Her newest album, Black Terry Cat, blends her Puerto Rican and Cuban roots with more contemporary R&B grooves. It represents an intense exploration of identity, while also giving us a lot of catchy summer jams.

Rubinos dances between Spanish and English while telling stories of her youth, police brutality, and the overuse of social media. Whether you choose to read into her lyrics or not, Black Terry Cat is a complex, beautiful and engaging experience.

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10 Songs for Your Juneteenth Celebration

By L.G. Parker

It’s ironic that I’m sharing a Juneteenth playlist after the attack on Emanuel AME. How might I suggest that you celebrate the June 19, 1865 emancipation from slavery when you’ve just witnessed a terrorist attack on a Black institution?

I suggest that this is the queerness of black celebration. Even as we celebrate, there are things that remind us that we shouldn’t. It’s the ache that makes the smile brighter, the dance stronger. Which calls to mind the life of joy, what comes before and afterwards that might lead us to re-imagine it.

In the South in particular, there are celebrations of Juneteenth every year.

I’ve witnessed these primarily as cookouts. During those hours, somebody’s uncle fries fish and babies waddle through grass almost as tall as them. Mosquitoes tear your legs up, aunties do their dance with a red cup in one hand and the world is still the world, your cousin still locked up, somebody kills somebody black, but the music is right so the work of forgetting is made easier and you arrive at something like joy.

 

 1. Earth, Wind, and Fire – September

2. Chaka Khan – Ain’t Nobody

3. Chaka Khan  — Tell Me Something Good

4. Earth, Wind, and Fire – Sing A Song

5. Carl Carlton – She’s A Bad Mama Jama

6. Maze feat. Frankie Beverly – Before I Let Go

7. Commodores – Brick House

8. Rick James – Give It To Me

9. E.U. – Da Butt

10. V.I.C – Wobble Baby

 

Photo: Wikipedia

 

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Black Twitter Hilariously Responds To Clinton’s Nomination With #GirlIGuessImWithHer

By: Chaya Crowder

For me, this presidential election season has been characterized by apathy. As a political scientist, I have been grappling with Paul Frymer’s notion of “electoral capture,” the idea that Black people as a whole essentially have no choice but to vote for the Democratic nominee. Perhaps Black Twitter best summed this up with the recent hashtags #GuessImWithHer and #GirlIGuessImWithHer. They are both hilarious and depressing.

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Drake Bores Us To Tears On His New Album ‘Views’

By: Sam Fleming

Drake is one of the few legitimate pop stars to come out of hip-hop. Already joining the ranks of rappers such as Eminem and Kanye West, he has had the quickest rise to fame and critical acclaim in recent memory.

With this fame has come scrutiny and labels. He is often referred to as being fake and is thought of as soft by rap fans and insiders alike. Drake dropped the mixtape If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late in early 2015 to fight these labels. The mixtape caught people off guard. It was a stark departure from the sentimental style he established previously. Proclaiming he didn’t care about haters, Drake stressed that more was more to come on his upcoming album, Views. But, that just wasn’t the case.

Photo: Marvel

‘Captain America: Civil War’ Felt Like More Of The Same With A Little Blackness On Top

By: Angelica Bastien

With Captain America: Civil War the clockwork-like efficiency of Marvel’s Cinematic Universe is on full display. Nearly a decade after it was kicked off with Iron Man (2008), Marvel has perfected its formula which mixes a blend of humor, light pathos, and bright-eyed optimism. The problem is the cracks in this methodology are beginning to show and these films desperately need to start coloring outside of the lines.

In Civil War, the strengths of the MCU brand—reliance on quips, increasingly smooth easily commodified storytelling, exceeding lightness—feel like weaknesses. As the superhero genre continues to balloon Marvel’s desire to tell the same types of stories with the same types of characters is proving to be increasingly rote.

Flickr/Gordon Correll

‘Queen of Katwe’ Trailer and ‘Black Panther’ Casting Puts Lupita Nyong’o In the Spotlight

By: Angelica Bastien

After winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in the 2013 film 12 Years A Slave Lupita Nyong’o’s film career didn’t catapult in the ways fans expected. But it looks like she’s coming back into the spotlight with the release of the Queen of Katwe trailer and news of her potential casting in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Hamilton cast are greeted by President Barack Obama.

The Tony Awards Do What The Oscars Wouldn’t with Diverse Nominations

By: Angelica Bastien

The recently released 2016 Tony Award nominations reflect the especially diverse season on Broadway. But for the first time in the history of the award, there is a great chance that all four musical acting categories will be won by people of color which brings up a lot of hope about how theatre is addressing the call from diversity from fans and critics alike. 

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These Four Poems About Black Hair, Resistance, and Love Will Brighten Your Day

Lamont Lilly is a writer, activist, and father whose work echoes the struggles for justice and ambitions of our generation.  These four poems push us to think differently about blackness in the contemporary moment.
From the author:
“Each piece is a reflection of the people, places and experiences of struggle that have shaped who I am–The Movement, the Black Aesthetic, strong Black women, our continued pursuit of Black Liberation. I just hope the people can receive it.”
 His forthcoming debut, Honor in the Ghetto was edited by Shahida Muhammad and will be out this fall.