More Than a Token: Parting reflections on being Black at the University of Chicago

This article was originally published in the Chicago Maroon.

“If I were you, I would just go to whatever state school you’ve already been accepted to. The University of Chicago is really a tough institution, and I’m not quite sure you’d do well there, if we’re being honest.”

I felt my heart beating fast, my mouth getting dry, and the tears welling up first in my right eye, and then my left. The man facing me was my alumni interviewer. He spent no more than one minute looking at the information College Admissions had given him about me. He spent no more than five asking about my background, the area of Dallas/Ft. Worth I lived in, and what my family situation was like.

Chicago teens sound off on Jason Whitlock, LeBron James, and racism in America

By: Taylor Bogert, Kiara Hyde, Chelsea Jackson (BYP Fellows)

 

Can a Black person ever truly outrun racism?

NBA superstar LeBron James found out the hard way when his California home was defaced by an unidentified person who spray painted the n-word on his front gate—the eve of the NBA Finals.

James talked thoughtfully about the incident saying “being Black in America is tough.”

Baltimore 7th grader wins individual chess championsip

Cahree Myrick, 12, is the pride of his community after winning a chess championship. Cahree isn’t just a chess champion, which is a great enough feat on its own. He’s the first individual national youth chess champion in the history of Baltimore after earning a perfect score at in Nashville, according to the Baltimore Sun.

Trevor Wilkins

Trevor Wilkins, Princeton Alum, Co-Created App That Encourages Good Grades

By Imani J. Jackson

#Blackboyjoy sounded more like hustle than hubris earlier this week during a telephonic interview with Trevor Wilkins. The tech entrepreneur is a Southside of Chicago native and celebrant. He is also a Princeton sociology graduate who shared parts of his journey to co-creating an app with more than a half million users that encourages students to get good grades.  

Rival Parents Yell ‘Go Back To Mexico’ To Fourth Grade Robotics Champs

The robotics team from Pleasant Run Elementary is comprised of five fourth graders – three of which are Latinx and two are Black. After competing against and beating nearly 35 other teams from the Indianapolis area on Feb. 2, the Pleasant Run PantherBots were on cloud nine until it came time to leave.

As the students and their parents made their way to the parking lot, they could hear two or three children yell “Go back to Mexico” at the group, according to USA Today.

Interview With Hari Ziyad: Finding Visibility and De-centering Whiteness

We are lucky to have people that walk through life challenging the world around them with each step. Writer and artist Hari Ziyad is one of those people, challenging the norms that whiteness has established for how we identify ourselves. Hari’s work has been featured in various publications, including Black Youth Projectwhere they are a contributing writer, and RaceBaitR, an online publication they have created.

D.C. Teacher Explains How The Famous ‘Du-Rag Lesson’ Happened

Last week, a video circulated online that showed Patrick Harris showing a group of his D.C. Public School students how to properly wear a du-rag. Most who watched it saw a pleasant exchange between mesmerized first graders and a teacher giving them an extra life lesson. So, we talked with Harris to learn more about the video and what motivates his work.