D.C. Teacher Explains How The Famous ‘Du-Rag Lesson’ Happened

Last week, a video circulated online that showed Patrick Harris showing a group of his D.C. Public School students how to properly wear a du-rag. Most who watched it saw a pleasant exchange between mesmerized first graders and a teacher giving them an extra life lesson. So, we talked with Harris to learn more about the video and what motivates his work.

Producer Jahaan Sweet Speaks Black Art and the Joke that Helped Him Graduate from Julliard

By: Imani J. Jackson

Asking people how they self-identify is more instructive than presumptively assigning them labels. So I asked Jahaan Sweet, during a recent hour-long, sit-down interview in an artsy enclave, who he is. “I consider myself a music maker.” He added that he is a burgeoning businessman, “I just like to create shit.” That spirit of Black creation, whether during the Depression Era Harlem Renaissance or Reagan Era rap movement, continues to thrive despite our oppressive conditions.

“Don’t Be A Bystander”: An Interview With Aaryn Lang On Responding to Racist Attacks [VIDEO]

The current political moment requires that young, socially-savvy people lead on issues of gendered oppression, racism, education inequality, and many other issues facing marginalized groups.

In this way, communication and movement building tie together tightly spreading information that can’t as easily be hidden, white washed, or ignored and creating a digital tool box for justice. Project NIA and The Barnard Center for Research on Women have added a resource to this toolbox, aimed at helping you respond to situations of violence on individual and systemic levels.

Teen View: Voices from Women’s March Chicago

Last week, six students from blackyouthproject.com’s high school journalism program traveled downtown to Columbus Drive and Congress for the Women’s March. Their goal: Talk to as many protesters as possible about why they joined the demonstration and what issues were important to them. Here’s what students learned …

Get to know Black Youth Project’s staff this holiday season

I am blessed enough to work with a staff of young writers who inspire me every single day. They are graduate students, community activists, educators, and content producers who make my job as Managing Editor that much easier. So, I wanted to take some time to spotlight them and give you a chance to get to know them a little better.

Liz Adetiba (Contributing Writer), Jordie Davies (Assistant Editor), Alyx Goodwin (Contributing Writer), Akudo Mez (Social Media Coordinator), and Keith Reid-Cleveland (News Editor) are the core voices of Black Youth Project. I got the chance to ask them a few questions about their thoughts as we move out of 2016 and into 2017. Here are their responses:

Chicago Rapper FM Supreme Talks Hip Hop, Black Lives Matter and Benefits of Travel

We recently had the pleasure of spending some time talking to Chicago MC, Jessica Disu aka FM Supreme, about her seat right at the intersection of hip-hop music and social activism. She also provided some gems about the significance of travel in self-improvement and the controversy surrounding her appearance on FOX News calling for the abolition of police.

Read the entire interview below.

Organizing in Chicago is a matter of strategy

By: Chaya Crowder

Young Black activists in Chicago are wholly committed to local community engagement and cultivating a new generation of politically empowered leaders. Chicago’s chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 continues to lead the way in the innovation of community organizing strategies and building efforts.

Black Youth Project 100 is an all Black, member-based organization comprised of young people ranging in age from 18 to 35, as well as a partner organization of Black Youth Project (BYP). BYP got the opportunity to speak to activists from Black Youth Project 100, including Johnaé Strong and Asha Rosa to discuss the organization’s goals and strategies towards achieving Black Liberation.