How our unhealthy understandings of accountability promote a race to the bottom

When Casey Affleck won the Oscar for his work in Manchester by the Sea last Sunday, many once again pointed out the racial double standard on sexual violence. If you recall, Nate Parker’s Oscar aspirations for his film The Birth of a Nation, initially regarded as a strong awards contender, were swiftly derailed when rape allegations against him from years ago resurfaced. Despite very similar past allegations, Affleck had no dim to his shine through his successful Oscar campaign. Similarly, the downfall of Bill Cosby, when contrasted with the continued success of Woody Allen, illuminates the ways in which anti-Blackness engenders a far more lenient response to sexual violence at the hands of white men compared to their Black counterparts.

Academy Awards Highlight Black Hollywood

Many predicted that this year’s Academy Awards would go to great lengths to celebrate diversity after the #OscarsSoWhite controversy came to a head last year. Fortunately, this year saw a surplus of quality content starring Black actors and actresses for the Academy to choose from.

As a result, Black Hollywood was celebrated in front of the entire world last night. 

The Scariest Part of ‘Get Out’ Was The Trueness To Life

SPOILERS AHEAD! Don’t @ me.

Over the weekend, Jordan Peele’s thriller Get Out scared audiences all over the nation with that age old American horror: anti-Black racism. The premise is simple enough: a white girl, Rose, brings home her Black boyfriend, Chris, to meet her parents in a wealthy, white suburb in upstate New York.

Producer Jahaan Sweet Speaks Black Art and the Joke that Helped Him Graduate from Juilliard

By: Imani J. Jackson

Asking people how they self-identify is more instructive than presumptively assigning them labels. So I asked Jahaan Sweet, during a recent hour-long, sit-down interview in an artsy enclave, who he is. “I consider myself a music maker.” He added that he is a burgeoning businessman, “I just like to create shit.” That spirit of Black creation, whether during the Depression Era Harlem Renaissance or Reagan Era rap movement, continues to thrive despite our oppressive conditions.

Chance the Rapper Hopes Trump Doesn’t Mean What We All Think He Does About Chicago

Chance the Rapper recently sat down with ESPN’s The Undefeated for a joint interview with Chicago Bulls player Jimmy Butler. The two talked about the city and how they’re each leaving their own legacies, one being a hometown kid who just won three Grammys, the other being the centerpiece of an historic basketball franchise.

During part of the discussion, Chance responded to President Donald Trump’s vague threats to “send in the feds” if Chicago’s gun violence wasn’t curbed. As a native of the city’s South Side, the rapper had some interesting insight.