Behind Amy Schumer’s ‘Get Out’ joke: The horrible legacy of claiming the Black phallus endangers white women

By Sherronda Brown

Amy Schumer is racist, and white women love her. The White Feminist icon’s most recent public display of Beckery is yet another demonstration of the sexual racism she so often falls back into, using racist stereotypes benefitting her white womanhood while decrying the sexual proclivities of men of color.

Two weeks ago, when asked about past instances of her own rude behavior in the bedroom in an interview with Andy Cohen on Watch What Happens: Live, Schumer answered: “A guy had an uncircumcised penis and it was too big and I just was like ‘Peace!’ Like, I got out. I got right out of there. I was like, ‘I’m not going to be deformed because I had sex with you once.’ That’s what the movie Get Out should have been about.”

education

What you need to know about Trump’s proposed $9 billion budget slashes to public education

This week, the Trump Administration released its budget, which includes $9 billion cuts to the Department of Education. The budget seeks to eliminate subsidized student loans, public service loan forgiveness, and many other programs that help millions of students afford higher education and succeed in school. These proposed changed are extremely harmful to public education as we know it today.

Liberation is a 3-step process: Broadening activism’s scope in the wake of the Movement for Black Lives

Contrary to popular belief, the Movement for Black Lives is not solely about police brutality. Bigger than body cameras and electoral politics, the Movement is about Black liberation and freedom for all Black people.

Liberation and freedom are unconventional in the sense that the system under which society currently operates makes those two realities impossible. In order to achieve them we need radical transformation, but how do we get there?

Revolutionary Poetry for Edward Crawford

By Lamont Lilly

Poetry has long sustained Black people. And, its role in the revolutionary work of freedom fighters cnnot be denied.

These poems are meant to be angry. They are also reminders to keep pushing, keep fighting and keep supporting each other, as we all seek the liberation and justice we so deserve. The last piece, “Sister Amina” is an ode to the Black women who brought us over — the aunties, the grandmothers, the nannies, the domestic workers. We certainly can never forget them!

This submission is dedicated to Edward Crawford  — the soldier, thewarrior, the fallen.


message from the grassroots

in spite of your tanks

teargas and detention centers.

your prisons, tasers and paid informants.

there will still be honor, love and understanding.

there will still be giving, justice and solidarity.

there will still be life

in the ghetto

worth living.

black babies will still be born

taught to hate you.

black poets will still launch words

meant to kill.


rank and file

bring your homemade signs

on cardboard

and wooden sticks.

bring your mic and megaphone

to loan voice.

bring your rocks

and molotov cocktails

in case they bring it.

bring your fire

for the teargas

that’s sure to come.

tell the scouts

to stay awake out there

we’re depending on them.

bring the women

so we can stand together

and fire back.


black seeds

from the master’s huts

slave quarters

and humble slums

grew strong men.

from the open fields

war kitchens

and vast auction blocks

grew diamond rocks.

from their battered hopes

and buried dreams

grew wildflowers

that refused to bow

bend

or be broken.


American Gothic by Gordon Parks

American Gothic by Gordon Parks

sister amina

(inspired by Gordon Parks and “American Gothic”)

she was amazing

stunning, actually.

beautiful like the kind

you don’t see very often.

even with that iron

dish towel

and heavy vacuum cleaner.

even with that

broom and dust pan

in her left hand.

black. proud.

working.

serving.

cleaning for ms. jane

cuz she was too dang lazy.

but still

she was amazing

stunning, actually.

beautiful like the kind

you don’t see very often.

so beautiful

even the dirt, grease

and ms. jane

couldn’t hide her.

 

Copyright © 2017 by Lamont Lilly. All rights reserved.


Lamont Lilly was the 2016 Workers World Party Vice-Presidential Candidate. In 2015 he was an Indy Week “Citizen Award” winner for his activism and journalism. The presented selections are from his forthcoming debut Honor in the Ghetto. Plain but poignant, his poetry directly derives from the marginalized, from the streets of mass struggle, from the Black experience and U.S. South.

When I, a Black person, was told I didn’t know enough about another culture to have opinions on slavery

Last week, something Trumpian must have sparked a race between major publications to put out the most fucked up writings on the topic of slavery.

On Tuesday, The New York Times compared Saartje Baartman–an enslaved Black woman who, in addition to the many other horrors she suffered both before and after her death, was forced to perform in freak shows due to her curvaceousness–to Kim Kardashian. Not to be outdone, The Atlantic’s June cover story, “My Family’s Slave”, written by the late Pulitzer Prize winner Alex Tizon, ignited an even bigger controversy with the tale of an abused Filipino maid, Eudocia “Lola” Tomas Pulida, who spent 56 years taking care of Tizon and his family without pay.

Reading came first: how I journeyed from hotep to Black queer feminist

By Myles E. Johnson

“Solitude can be a must-be-desired condition. In silence, we listen to ourselves, and in the quietude we may even hear the voice of God.” – Maya Angelou

The search, as it were, began in wanting to deep-dive into something that was about me, and it began early. I wanted a nappy-headed God. I wanted a history dipped in tar, baby, and I wanted to know about political leaders with Jackson 5 nostrils. This history was not being served to me anywhere, so I reimagined my middle-school classes as spaces for me to find this new world where I was the sun, where I was centered. While my teacher taught the day’s arithmetic, I was slowly, quietly being radicalized by the contents of books. With each page turn, a bomb exploded, and a window was being opened, and nobody was any the wiser.

The authors that I discovered–including Alex Haley, Frederick Douglass, and WEB Dubois–are part of what guided my 13 year-old brain into the place it is currently, and where it is developing into. However, I had a desire for something that made sense of the world I was occupying the way religion does for a new initiate.

Chicago man charged after punching Black woman security guard, Zoa Stigler, on camera

Zoa Stigler was just doing her job this past weekend when she stopped to help Matthew De Leon. De Leon, 23, was throwing up outside of a building where Stigler, 46, was working as a security guard early Sunday morning.

After Stigler asked if he needed any help, she asked him and his friends to move so she could wash the vomit off the sidewalk. De Leon then threw a bottle of water at her and punched her in the face. 

I’ll still complain about politics even when I don’t vote – fight me.

I am a non-voter who has the audacity to still be upset that my people are dying. I have been told innumerable times that I am not supposed to be allowed this. “If you don’t vote, you can’t complain” is perhaps the most common non-voter shaming refrain I’ve heard, right up there with “your ancestors died for the right to vote.”

But I am not generally one to accept what society allows me to do as gospel.

I learned this from those very same ancestors, who, as even non-voter shamers acknowledge, lost their lives so that I could do what they weren’t allowed. Some say their deaths were only for my right to vote, but I know they died to get closer to freedom. I know they died also to be able to refuse the vote if it does not work towards that freedom. I know that my people are still dying–still died even when I did vote–and, if anything, my ancestors lost their lives so that I would never let anything get in the way of raising hell about it.

Bank Black Movement OneUnited

Yes, Black liberals commodify Black Lives Matter too and it’s a major problem

By Blake Simons

The present day Movement for Black Lives, which I argue was revived by the people of Oakland after the murder of Oscar Grant, and came into fruition because of the rebellion that working class Black folks started in Ferguson after the murder of Mike Brown, has been co-opted by Black capitalistic neo-liberals.