West Point Cadets

These Black West Point Cadets’ Raised Fists Are Not All That Political

If pictures are worth 1,000 words, the same must be said for symbols. But the words that people see in them can greatly vary depending on the lens they use.

For many, the Confederate flag is looked upon as a visual ode to a time no one living today even saw, yet many idolize it with a sense of nostalgia. On the other hand, a lot of people can’t ignore the centuries of slavery and racism that raised the flag in the first place. While this juxtaposition isn’t surprising, it can often be divisive like many other symbols that touch on racial identity and history.

For example, this year’s graduating class from the U.S. Military Academy in West Point holds more than 900 cadets, according to CNN. 18 of them are black women. 16 of those same black women got together for a group photo that’s bringing out vastly different reactions from the public and military alike.

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President of Morehouse College Joins Spelman Student in Solidarity

The president of Morehouse College has spoken up about the Spelman student who had been raped. The college is pursuing an investigation regarding allegations that a women attending the neighboring Spelman College was gang-raped by four Morehouse students at a party,which the student anonymously shared on Twitter under the moniker @RapedAtSpelman.


Viola Davis and Kerry Washington are Creating Production Companies

So far, 2016 has been a wonderful year for Black woman seizing their own opportunities. Early this spring, Kelly Rowland announced that she plans on starting a makeup line for dark-skinned women.  Shea Moisture is taking a stand against the racism in the beauty industry. Recently, it was announced that Kerry Washington and Viola Davis are launching independent production companies. Take a moment to embrace all this Black girl magic.

Picture from Pierre Jean-Louis' Instagram.

Jean-Louis’ Images are a Reminder of the Beauty and Power of Black Hair

Earlier this year, Pierre Jean-Louis, an artist based on the East Coast, posted a photo of a Black woman’s hair that he reimagined as a piece of art that looked like a perfectly coiled galaxy. Since then, Jean-Louise has continued to post artistic renditions of Black women’s hair on Instagram, and every photo is as beautiful as the last.  


7 Black Sitcom Moms We Love In Our Bones

There have always been beautiful Black mothers – whether from our birth, adopted, or chosen families – who offered words of wisdom, care, and safety to each of us. Similarly, it was our imaginary moms and aunties who held a special place in our hearts too.

Most of the moms on television are White and represent the mainstream ideals of society. But, Black moms on television often must contend with a host of issues which are typically invisible on mainstream shows. These 8 moms fit that description perfectly.

Jahana Hayes Barack Obama

President Obama Introduced National Teacher Of the Year

Jahana Hayes, a history teacher at John F. Kennedy High School in Waterbury, Conn., didn’t even think she would become a teacher when she was growing up, better yet the National Teacher of the Year. But with the help of some teachers in her own life, she was able to set higher standards for herself than what was expected in her local community.

Now, Hayes not only excels in the classroom, but encourages students to play a role in their neighborhoods through community service and fundraising, according to the Root.

SANTA MONICA, CA - FEBRUARY 21: Justin Simien is photographed at the Film Independent Spirit Awards for  on February 21, 2015 in Santa Monica, California.

‘Dear White People’ Comes to Netflix

On May 5, all Dear White People enthusiasts received some very exciting news about the changes coming to the franchise. The movie is being turned into a show for Netflix.

Netflix has ordered a TV adaptation of the Justin Simien 2014 comedy for a 2017 release date. Similar to the film, the Netflix series will chart the lives of a group of students of color who deal with adult problems associated with race, privilege, and power at a fictional Ivy League university.

Obama Flint Water

Obama Drinks Water In Flint To Prove It’s Safe

The people of Flint, MI have been understandably distrusting of local government officials’ claims that their tap water was clean enough to drink even with the use of filters. To help sway locals, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder has been drinking the same filtered water for weeks (even though this hasn’t been enough to keep residents from booing him at a recent press conference). He’s now gotten one of the best cosigns he could’ve asked for.

President Barack Obama announced that he’d be visiting Flint, MI in a letter to an 8-year-old girl commonly known as “Little Miss Flint.” During his visit on Wednesday (May 5), Obama spoke to reporters and drank a glass of Flint’s filtered water to let people know it was safe.


Janet Mock: Trans Women Live At The Intersection Of ‘Pass Her By And Pay Her No Mind’

“If you had one recommendation for recognizing the full identity and addressing the needs of transgender women, what would it be?”

This question was asked to trans activist Janet Mock on Friday, April 29, 2016 at the United Nations headquarters where she spoke on a panel about the need for more visibility of trans black women when talking about issues like homelessness, sex work, rape, and sexual assault.

Photo of ballet dancers by 
Sebastian Miranda

Na Ponta dos Pés is a Ballet Studio and a Safe Haven for Brazilian Girls

Although she did not aspire to become a professional ballet dancer, Tuany Nascimento never stopped practicing ballet while in Brazil.  Whenever she practiced, groups of young girls always followed her, wanting to learn and emulate her skills as a dancer. Nascimento not only taught these young girls, in 2013 she opened the dance studio, Na Ponta dos Pés, and started teaching young girls ballet.