An Open Letter to Rep. John Lewis

WORKERS WORLD PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE’S LETTER TO REP. JOHN LEWIS:

 “Standing on the Wrong Side of History”

 

Dear Brother John Lewis,

I am a Black woman, who, like you, was born in Alabama at the dawn of the modern-day Civil Rights Movement. My parents supported the Montgomery Bus Boycott. I, like millions of others, suffered through the indignities of Jim Crow, including watching, as an adolescent, my mother being “escorted” out of a white-only public bathroom by the police.

So I understand firsthand and respect your bravery and your contribution to the Black freedom struggle.

I Love Amber Rose’s Commentary on Clothes and Consent

Men will tell you that a short skirt makes it okay to touch a woman’s body. Men will tell you that a low cut shirt gives them a right to look at your breasts. Even more men will suggest that hanging out late on a weekend night, intoxicated, and in public opens a young woman up to be sexually assaulted by any guy who happens upon her. What most men won’t say is that these aspects of “toxic masculinity” are evidence of the pervasiveness of rape culture rather than an effort to keep women “respectable.”

The Protests For Ex-Officer Peter Liang Are Anti-Black Racism

Civilian protesting has a long history in this country. From early European ethnic minorities in the meat factories and steel mills, to Japanese blue-collar workers fighting back against internment, to current actions to preserve and fund Black futures, public demonstrations against oppressive institutions have been a sign of solidarity with minoritized groups around the world for generations. But, then, there are other times where protests are held to marginalize already oppressed groups or to diminish the quality of life for those whose civil rights are often ignored and undermined. These past few weeks, we have seen just that happen with protests by mostly Asian Americans who demand “justice for Peter Liang,” the ex-officer who was convicted of manslaughter for killing a young Black man named Akai Gurley in November 2014.

Former Black Panther, Albert Woodfox, Freed From Jail After 43 Years

A former Black Panther activist who was in solitary confinement for 43 years was freed from a United States prison after years of legal cases trying to prove his innocence.

Albert Woodfox was the last one of the “Angola Three” activists to be freed from jail; their case invoked many emotions out of activist groups, but anger was the one that presided the most.

It’s More Than A Head Wrap For US

At the beginning of Black History Month, a group of Black girls at the School for Creative Studies in Durham, North Carolina wanted to wear “geles”, also known as head wraps, in order to celebrate their African heritage. How did the school administration respond to this celebration of Black culture? Negatively and without any consideration for what the head wraps could have meant for the young women.

We Should Be Happy Antonin Scalia Died

Everyone always says: “Just be patient. Once all the old racist, misogynist white men die, everything will be fine.” If that’s true, then perhaps, this week’s news about Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s unexpected death should be considered a collective step closer to the goal of dismantling systemic racism.

To be honest, Scalia was trash. It’s been a few days since he was found dead and that truth is still evident. People (mostly conservatives) will defend his record, calling him a patriot or some other term that is actually violent towards non-Whites. But, most folks know that Scalia’s actions while on the SCOTUS were primarily in support of the oppression of non-whites, women, and other marginalized groups and the maintenance of institutional racism. His death, then, is not really very sad.