Here’s what young people think about police violence and guns

The survey findings below are summarized in the report “Gun Violence, Policing, and Young Communities of Color – July 2016” which can be downloaded here.

The recent police killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile have raised important questions on the issues of gun violence, policing, and communities of color in the United States. Most importantly, the increased media attention to this issue shines a light on the ways that people of all genders, races, ages, and classes develop political opinions on these societal conditions.

Study: Free Condoms Without Safe Sex Education Increase Teen Pregnancy

A study of sex education outcomes finds that sex education programs that distribute condoms to high school students without the proper counseling increase teen fertility by about ten percent. This is important information for students and administrators of sex education.

The study also found that schools that provided counseling services did not see the same increase in teen fertility rates. In fact, schools that required students to undergo safe sex counseling in order to access condoms saw a decrease or reverse in teen fertility rates. Clearly, it is time (and it has been time) to talk about sex with teens instead of just using free condoms, abstinence language and simply hoping for the best..

New Media, Activism, and the Origins of BYP100

In a new working paper entitled “And then the Zimmerman Verdict Happens,” Nathan Jamel Riemer discusses the development of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100, the Black Youth Project’s sister, activist organization) amidst developments in new media and a persistently hostile and anti-black racial environment in the United States. The paper, number 3 in a series written for the Youth & Participatory Politics Research Network, considers how new media, including the Internet and social media, enables black youth activism and a new type of “participatory politics”—that is, political behaviors and activities outside of traditional or institutional forms.

The First-Generation: Another Perspective Of The Low Black STEM Population

Everyone keeps asking why there aren’t more Black STEM students and professionals. But few are discussing the difficulties faced by first-generation Black students.

I am not shy about my experiences as an engineering student at the University of Southern California and STEM professional in Orange County, California. To put it lightly, it wasn’t fun. Actually, it was horrible. That’s why all of these articles asking why there aren’t more Black coders or more Black scientists or more Black students in STEM majors irritate me to no end. The focus on Black and STEM students and professionals and their invisibility is a much more nuanced conversation than many of these articles let on.

Black Children Are More Likely to Be Beaten By Their Teachers

As a mother of three, one of the central concerns I have each is for the safety of my children. While my partner and I have opted not to use corporal punishment in our household, we know that some parents still advocate for its use in their own homes. However, corporal punishment in schools is something (I thought) was a thing of the past. Apparently it isn’t and it is happening far too frequently to Black children.

Protection or Invasion of Privacy? Parents and the Social Media Age

Social media has taken over the modern day teenager’s life. This pervasive adoption of technology has heightened the level of Internet protection education, but also the awareness that parents need to be involved with their child’s digital behavior. While parents have every right to be involved in the multifaceted lives of their teens, where does this line of privacy be drawn?

Why it’s important that men are writing about rape

On Wednesday, the Women’s Media Center released research findings which suggest that – even though 20 percent of women versus 2 percent of men will be raped in their lifetimes, stories about rape are usually written by men. This gender discrepancy affects not only who continue to write about rape but also how these stories are told.