Artist Makeda Lewis on Luck And Her Now Iconic Afro-Feminist Coloring Book

By: L. G. Parker

By now you’ve heard of Atlanta-based artist Makeda Lewis. The 25-year-old multidisciplinary artist’s Avie’s Dreams, an Afro-Feminist coloring book and surrealist poem, has been celebrated by Saint Heron, Nylon, Blavity and more. In its rich pages, uncolored images are accompanied by introspective words that speak to the artists journey as a person as well as Avie’s self-evolution, the book’s central character.

The Bigots Are Right: The HIV Epidemic Among Black, Gay Men is from Immorality

By: Marq Montgomery

**This article was originally posted at AngryBlackHoemo.com and has been republished with permission**

 

It’s Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, so it’s a good of a time as any to dive into this topic.

When we talk about the HIV/AIDS epidemic among Gay men, in general, there’s often an air of judgement and condescension, dripping with implications that any of us who contract the virus “deserve it” for our “immoral” behavior. And when you add in the racism of addressing Black, Gay men, that attitude only grows…even from other Gay men.

4 Ways to Deal with Politically Different Family this Holiday

This holiday season, many of us will return home to our families, who, even though they love us very much and we love them, may hold different political beliefs. It won’t be easy.

The current political moment is an especially tough one if you or your loved ones voted for different presidential candidates back in November. In order to get through this holiday season not only dealing with politically different family, but truly enjoying yourself and your time together, here are 4 tips to breeze through the holidays with family who may not be so “woke.”

Four Ways to #StayBlack on Black Friday

It’s Black Friday, or the day after the Thanksgiving holiday. While yesterday was a #NationalDayOfMourning for many, today is often a chance for people who celebrate the day to dive into left-overs, relax with family, and for many of us, shop ’til we drop. While we are buying presents for loved ones and ourselves, whether we are overjoyed or overwhelmed, let us keep in mind a few ways that we can #StayBlack amidst the holiday hoopla and the political tension that has been mounting in this country for months.

Prioritizing Mental Health In The Era of Trump

I am one of those people who attempted to (and probably failed at) ignoring the presidential race for much of 2016. The prospect of potentially having to choose between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was grief inducing enough but to watch the campaign antics in real-time felt like a malignant form of self-harm.

However, now that Trump is the president-elect (a phrase I struggle with even typing at this moment), I – like many others – am forced to reckon with the realities before me. I have seen many people posting memes about drinking to cope with the election results or joking about starting nonprescription drugs to distract them from what is surely to come. And, while I – like so many others – have considered self-medicating as a way to cope, I am convinced that we must also be frank in this moment about the very real anxiety and fear this new political development brings on in an effort to move our collective grief toward collective action and healing.

Kid Cudi Reminded Me To Manage My Depression

Kid Cudi’s Man on the Moon 2: The Legend of Mr. Rager was released during my first semester in college.  After looking forward to it for weeks, I played it on my laptop as soon as it came out.

When it was over, I turned to my roommate and asked for his thoughts. He admitted that it was good, but ultimately not for him. Now that I’ve known him for more than six years, I can understand why.

Kid Cudi Checks Himself Into Rehab Due To Depression

Not too long ago, depression was merely viewed as “the blues,” people with anxiety were just “high-strung,” and mental disorders were all lumped into insensitive categories. But people coming out to publicly discuss their personal battles with mental health has helped make mental health more important to the general public.

Four Ways Patriarchy Became The Norm In My Romantic Life

This article was originally posted at Water Cooler Convos.

I recently watched a video where trans men explained the idea of male privilege. In the video, they talked about how, after transitioning, they experienced a sense of freedom when walking down the street and moving in public spaces. They noticed that people stopped cutting them off when they spoke. In essence, they were shocked by the ways that their perceived manliness made people treat them like humans.

Their comments were so striking because they made me reflect on the ways that male privilege (the process wherein male and male-presenting people gain undue benefits just by the nature of their perceived gender) and toxic masculinity (the ways that patriarchy operates to create a culture where male and male-presenting people are expected to exhibit harmful behaviors usually against women) have informed my life. As I recounted my many interactions, I realized the countless instances and hours of my life that I have spent trying to avoid predatory, stalkerish men. In fact, so much of my life has been dedicated to patriarchy that it has become as normal as breathing.

5 Ways To Stop Harming Black Women Today

One of my favorite gospel songs growing up said, “Give me my flowers, while I yet live, so that I can see the beauty that they bring.” The song always stuck with me now it resonates even more.

This past Friday, Joyce Quaweay was brutally beaten by her boyfriend and his friend reportedly because she would not submit. On Saturday, Skye Mockabee (26) was found dead in a Cleveland parking lot.  And, on Monday, Korryn Gaines (23) was killed while holding her 5-year-old son in her arms. As Brittney Cooper so aptly notes at the Crunk Feminist Collective, all of these women’s deaths are connected. To see them any other way is to deny the culture of white hetero-patriarchy in this country.

As a queer Black woman in the United States, I am keenly aware that my mere existence in public spaces is seen as disruptive, agitating, confrontational, and deserving of violence. For many trans and cis Black women, these sentiments extend into their private spaces as well. So how do we work to protect one another in moments like these? What do we do next?

Here are a few things we can work on right now that can help move toward collective liberation.

Kid Cudi Opens Up About Living with Depression

By: Angelica Bastien

**Trigger warning: depression, suicide**

In recent years, Kid Cudi has focused more on his work as an actor including his latest role in Vincent-N-Roxxy which recently made its debut at the Tribeca Film Festival. But he’s coming back to his musical roots with a feature on Kanye West’s The Life of Pablo album and his own new music coming out soon, which Kid Cudi discusses in an interview with Billboard. While Kid Cudi may seem to live a charmed life, in his interview he details how he has struggled with depression.