Trevor Wilkins

Trevor Wilkins, Princeton Alum, Co-Created App That Encourages Good Grades

By Imani J. Jackson

#Blackboyjoy sounded more like hustle than hubris earlier this week during a telephonic interview with Trevor Wilkins. The tech entrepreneur is a Southside of Chicago native and celebrant. He is also a Princeton sociology graduate who shared parts of his journey to co-creating an app with more than a half million users that encourages students to get good grades.  

In 2016, UVA Medical Students Think Blacks Feel Less Pain Than Whites

Welcome to America where Blacks are consistently marginalized and stereotyped, and color matters more than ever. People are more likely to arrest you if you are Black, and even Raven-Symone won’t hire you if your name sounds too Black.

In a new study, white doctors think that Black people are invincible to the pains that they deal with on a regular basis. There was a study run by the University of Virginia which gathered more than 111 medical students who wholeheartedly believed non-truths about black people, like the idea that African-American blood clots faster than that of Whites.

Black Engineer Creates Blendoor App To Fight Hiring Discrimination

Whether it be because of a subconscious urge to maintain a status quo or wholly intentional, there’s a clear problem with hiring practices in America. A disproportionate number of jobs in multiple sectors go to white men while women of all races and other people of color are often left out to compete for what’s left.

To help combat this, Stephanie Lampkin, an engineer who has been working in technology since she was a teenager and graduated from Stanford and MIT, has launched a new blind recruitment app called Blendoor, according to the Grio.

The First-Generation: Another Perspective Of The Low Black STEM Population

Everyone keeps asking why there aren’t more Black STEM students and professionals. But few are discussing the difficulties faced by first-generation Black students.

I am not shy about my experiences as an engineering student at the University of Southern California and STEM professional in Orange County, California. To put it lightly, it wasn’t fun. Actually, it was horrible. That’s why all of these articles asking why there aren’t more Black coders or more Black scientists or more Black students in STEM majors irritate me to no end. The focus on Black and STEM students and professionals and their invisibility is a much more nuanced conversation than many of these articles let on.