Teacher Resources

The Teacher Resources page encompasses curriculum/lesson plans, professional development training programs, and tools that enrich teachers’ instructional time covering issues of race, gender, class, and sexuality.

9/11 Backlash against Muslims in America

In this lesson plan, students will:

  • Participate in a class debate examining whether the media shapes our ideas about different groups of people.
  • Consider how television programs and movies affect our perception of ethnic groups.
  • Learn what research has been done on this topic.

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A to Z Teacher Stuff

A to Z Teacher Stuff is a teacher-created site designed to help teachers find online resources more quickly and easily. Find lesson plans, thematic units, teacher tips, discussion forums for teachers, downloadable teaching materials & eBooks, printable worksheets and blacklines, emergent reader books, themes, and more. This website host over 200 social studies lesson plans.

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African American History and Heritage Site

The lesson plans found on this website encompass curriculum and resources that pertain to the Civil Rights Movement.

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An archaeology of ‘race’

This teaching pack attempts to explore the reality of multi-cultural Britain, which reaches far back into history. It examines the Northern Frontier of Hadrian’s Wall as being, in Roman times, a site of multicultural flows, and residency of the African Emperor of Rome, Septimius Severus who lived and died in York (211). It also explores the resultant benefits of this to British society, as we know it today.

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ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development)

Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner. Our 170,000 members in 136 countries are professional educators from all levels and subject area “superintendents, supervisors, principals, teachers, professors of education, and school board members.

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A School Nurse’s Guide to Kids’ Health and Safety

As children spend most of their waking hours in school, school nurses are on the front lines in the battle to keep children healthy. They are in charge of creating age appropriate programming to encourage students to make healthy choices in all aspects of their lives, from exercise and eating right to being aware of how they can get sick. School nurses also administer basic first aid and, with parental permission, can treat mild fevers or headaches with the use of over the counter medicines.

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Black New Yorkers for Educational Excellence (BNYEE)

We intend to organize and build through progressive ideas and direct action a dynamic “Education for Liberation” Black Education Movement. This Movement will reveal and institutionalize the truth about our history Of Resistance and Struggle. It will also connect to contemporary national and global issues of empire, poverty, racism, militarism and environmental degradation. Furthermore, we will advocate for our Fundamental Human Right to the acquisition of all rights and privileges of modern society for people of African ancestry.

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Books through Bars

Founded in the late 1980s and formally incorporated as an organization in 2000, Books Through Bars was established to address the paucity of educational resources and programming made available to prisoners hoping to use the time of their imprisonment to effect positive change in their lives. By distributing free educational materials to prisoners, Books Through Bars facilitates prisoner education; thereby promoting successful community re-integration. Books Through Bars has developed several innovative youth programs, including youth workshops, integrated service-learning activities, and a curriculum using book requests to illustrate the issues surrounding imprisonment.

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BUILD, Inc.

Since 1969, BUILD, Inc. has worked in some of Chicago’s toughest neighborhoods giving at-risk youth alternatives to the violence that takes away their positive potential. Applying their model of positive youth development, BUILD seeks to redirect the behavior of gang-affiliated youth and potential gang recruits in order to improve their chances of leading fulfilling lives and to increase the stability and safety of the communities in which they reside.

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Changing Attitudes in America

Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute has developed a thorough curriculum examining US changing attitudes about race.

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Critical Multicultural Pavilion

As state-defined standards of learning and standardized tests become more and more closely identified as measures of achievement, not only for students, but also for teachers, administrators, schools and school districts, teachers are feeling less empowered to employ creative means for make their curricula more inclusive and accessible to all students. Even as the Internet and other new educational media broaden classroom access to a virtually endless stream of new resources, perspectives, and interactive capabilities, most curricula are necessarily built around textbooks and standardized tests. These and other contextual factors highlight some of the formidable challenges to any process of curriculum transformation. This section of the Multicultural Pavilion will serve as a starting point for teachers who, despite these challenges, are determined to create a more inclusive, multicultural curriculum for their students.

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Destiny Arts Center

Founded in 1988, Destiny’s mission is to address the direct correspondence of increasing crime and violence to the declining existence of safe, accessible after-school activities in Oakland. Today, healthy environments, safe spaces, basic resources, positive role models, and creative pursuits, continue to be visibly absent elements in the Oakland neighborhoods we serve. The entrenched frustration, depression and tension of our youth are palpable.

Our research has identified isolation and prejudice as key social issues that intensify unresolved feelings of anger, despair and aggression. Our award-winning martial and performing arts programs and published violence prevention methodology represent twenty years of directly addressing these issues, and assisting young people (age 3-18) to learn to react positively and nonviolently to negative stimuli.

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Digital History Home

This is lesson plan examines slavery and racism in the US.

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Discrimination Based on Race Curriculum

This lesson explores discrimination based on race. The lesson is in three sections, each framed by guiding questions such as: What is race? What are my beliefs about racial differences? What are some of the causes and impacts of racial discrimination? What is being done to address Racial discrimination? What can I do?

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Education for Liberation Network

The Education for Liberation Network is a national coalition of teachers, community activists, researchers, youth and parents who believe a good education should teach people particularly low-income youth and youth of color how to understand and challenge the injustices their communities face.

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Educational Video Center

The Educational Video Center is a non-profit youth media organization dedicated to teaching documentary video as a means to develop the artistic, critical literacy, and career skills of young people, while nurturing their idealism and commitment to social change. Founded in 1984, EVC has evolved from a single video workshop for teenagers from Manhattan’s Lower East Side to become an internationally acclaimed leader in youth media education. EVC’s teaching methodology brings together the powerful traditions of student-centered progressive education and independent community documentary.

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Gay Marriage

Through this lesson, the student will come to understand the history and process of amending the U.S. Constitution, particularly in light of the current issue facing the courts of legalizing gay marriage.

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Gender Stereotypes and Body Image

To make students aware of the dangers of gender stereotyping and the media’s role in perpetuating gender stereotypes.

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GLSEN (Gay Lesbian Straight Education Network)

The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network strives to assure that each member of every school community is valued and respected regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity/expression.

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Harriet Tubman: An American hero

The goal is to introduce students to that time in American history when slavery was legal and accepted in society and business.Students will listen to and view appropriate materials about Harriet Tubman’s life and discuss and re-tell parts of Harriet Tubman’s life as they create a class chart or diagram with the teacher select events from Tubman’s life that illustrate why she is considered an American hero.

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Harriet Tubman and the Underground Rail Road

This lesson plan examines the life of Harriet Tubman and the issue of slavery in the US.

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Harvard Kennedy School’s Leadership, Organizing and Action program

Leadership, Organizing and Action: Leading Change is an online program designed to help leaders of civic associations, advocacy groups and social movements learn how to organize communities that can mobilize power to make change.

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Hyde Park/Kenwood Community Conference

This resource database for parents, youth, LSCs, teachers and administrators is brought to you by the Schools Committee of Hyde Park-Kenwood Community Conference.

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Identity and Protest: To Kill a Mocking Bird

African American history during the Jim Crow era includes encounters with poverty, racism, disrespect, and protest. Harper Lee develops all four of these themes in her famous 1960 novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. To help students understand these ideas, this lesson incorporates the blues and other literature of the time. Ultimately, students will be asked to consider both African American oppression and activism through a variety of lenses.

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In Motion: The African American Migration Experience

In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience presents a new interpretation of African-American history, one that focuses on the self-motivated activities of peoples of African descent to remake themselves and their worlds. Of the thirteen defining migrations that formed and transformed African America, only the transatlantic slave trade and the domestic slave trades were coerced, the eleven others were voluntary movements of resourceful and creative men and women, risk-takers in an exploitative and hostile environment. Their survival skills, efficient networks, and dynamic culture enabled them to thrive and spread, and to be at the very core of the settlement and development of the Americas. Their hopeful journeys changed not only their world and the fabric of the African Diaspora but also the Western Hemisphere.

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K12 Lesson Plans: free teacher and classroom websites

Create a free teacher website. Easy to use. 5 Minute setup! Announcements, calendar, mailing list, image galleries, online quizzes and more!

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Learning to Respect Each Other

This is lesson plan is designed to help students understand the following:

  • Dr. Martin Luther King was a strong advocate of nonviolent protest and fought for civil rights for all Americans with an eloquence that can be found in speeches such as his famous “I Have a Dream” speech.
  • Throughout U.S. history, certain groups of people have been discriminated against for characteristics as superficial as the color of their skin. That racism still exists despite the passage of laws that make it illegal.
  • Stereotypes can lead people to make unfair judgments about individuals and groups.
  • Segregation is hurtful and unfair to those discriminated against.

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Facing History and Ourselves

These lessons and units demonstrate how our resources and our Scope and Sequence can be applied within a classroom setting. Since every learning context is unique, we expect educators to adapt these ideas to their own students’ needs. Lessons typically include activities that run between one and two hours. Units are a series of lessons that address the same resource or theme. Many lessons rely on resources that are only available to teachers in the Facing History network.

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Lessons On Discrimination Based on Race

This lesson explores discrimination based on race. The lesson is in three sections, each framed by guiding questions: A. Introduction to Race (What is race? What are my beliefs about racial differences?) B. Racial Discrimination: Influences and Impacts (What are some of the causes and impacts of racial discrimination?)

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“Love, Race and Liberation: ‘Til the White Day is Done”

The title of this guide gives a nod to the one of the greatest poets of the Twentieth Century. ‘Til the White Day is Done is a line from the 1926 poem Dream Variation’s by Langston Hughes. In the daytime universe of the poem the narrator dreams of flinging his arms wide in the face of the sun—an act of protest and resistance, of joy and celebration. ‘Til the White Day Is Done represents a commitment to end oppression in all forms- to eliminate the current “White Day.” White people are the world’s minority, yet white supremacy and racism are the scaffolding on which the American political and socioeconomic systems are built. This guide adds the new millennium piece of making sure the important elements of love and liberation are included in all conversations about race. This book was conceived by educator-activists JLove Calderon and Marcella Runell Hall in an effort to put action steps behind anti-racist rhetoric, in a move toward being truly and unapologetically pro-liberation–for everyone.

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Mikva Challenge

Mikva Challenge develops the next generation of civic leaders, activists and policy-makers. We do this by providing young people with opportunities to actively participate in the political process, because we believe that the best way to learn leadership and to learn democracy is to experience both.

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Misusing the Black Vernacular: Hurston, Hughes, and Toomer

This is lesson plan examines the black literary tradition of Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston.

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Museum of the Moving Image

The following eight lessons are designed for use by high school teachers and students. Each lesson contains direct links to the relevant television or web ads. The New York City and New York State curriculum standards which each lesson is designed to meet are specified at the end of the document.

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National Campaign to Restore Civil Rights

Created in response to recent federal court decisions that are eroding civil rights protections, the National Campaign to Restore Civil Rights is a collection of more than one hundred civil rights organizations and numerous individuals who came together to ensure that the courts protect and preserve justice, fairness, and opportunity for everyone. The Campaign focuses on public education and outreach, finding ways to get the message out about the impact of court rulings on their communities, their opportunities and their rights.

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New York Collective of Radical Educators (NYCore)

New York Collective of Radical Educators (NYCoRE) is a group of public school educators committed to fighting for social justice in our school system and society at large, by organizing and mobilizing teachers, developing curriculum, and working with community, parent, and student organizations. We are educators who believe that education is an integral part of social change and that we must work both inside and outside the classroom because the struggle for justice does not end when the school bell rings.

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Our Education

Our Education is the voice of young people across the country who believe that all American children should have access to high quality education. Created as a response to the sad reality that the most critical stakeholders in education are students themselves who do not have a voice in school reform efforts, Our Education’s mission is to improve K-12 education by engaging and empowering America’s youth in a national movement for better schools.

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Sound Out

SoundOut promotes student voice in school through research, training, and resource-sharing. Our systemic approaches to whole-school reform emphasize practical, considerable and holistic roles for students as partners in learning and leadership throughout education. SoundOut’s activities are based on Adam Fletcher’s Frameworks for Meaningful Student Involvement. We offer a variety of activities based on those Frameworks, as well as a classroom curriculum for middle and high school students.

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Racism Law & Attitude

This is lesson plan is designed to help students understand the difference between de facto and de jure discrimination in the United States and to understand the challenges in creating and enforcing laws that make certain racist actions and speech illegal.

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Real World Professional Development

REAL World Professional Development is an educational communications platform for organizations and individuals committed to embracing diversity, community and spiritual awareness.

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Rethinking Schools

Rethinking Schools began as a local effort to address problems such as basal readers, standardized testing, and textbook-dominated curriculum. Since its founding in 1986, it has grown into a nationally prominent publisher of educational materials, with subscribers in all 50 states, all 10 Canadian provinces, and many other countries.

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River of Words

River of Words is a California-based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. We have been conducting training workshops for teachers, park naturalists, grassroots groups, state resource agencies, librarians and others since 1995, helping them to incorporate observation-based nature exploration and the arts into their work with young people.

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Taking It Global

Youth everywhere actively engaged and connected in shaping a more inclusive, peaceful and sustainable world. We enable a collaborative learning community which provides youth with access to global opportunities, cross-cultural connections and meaningful participation in decision making.

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Teaching For Change

Teaching for Change provides teachers and parents with the tools to transform schools into centers of justice where students learn to read, write and change the world.

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Teachers for Social Justice

Teachers for Social Justice (TSJ) is an organization of teachers, administrators, pre-service teachers, and other educators working in public, independent, alternative, and charter schools and universities in the Chicago area. We have come together based on our commitment to education for social justice. We are working toward classrooms and schools that are anti-racist, multicultural / multilingual, and grounded in the experiences of our students.

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Teachers 4 Social Justice

Teachers 4 Social Justice is a grassroots non-profit teacher support and development organization. Our mission is to provide opportunities for self-transformation, leadership, and community building to educators in order to affect meaningful change in the classroom, school, community and society.

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Teaching Tolerance: A Project of the Southern Poverty Law Center

Teaching Tolerance is dedicated to reducing prejudice, improving intergroup relations and supporting equitable school experiences for our nation’s children.

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The Association of Raza Educators

The Association of Raza Educators was established to uphold the rights and liberties of the Raza community. Education is essential to the preservation of civil and human rights. It provides the foundation for all political and economic progress and it must be a basic right of all people. Making this right a reality is the fundamental objective of A.R.E. Raza has been and continues to be oppressed by the educational system within the United States. Therefore, we are obligated to ensure that education serves as a tool for the liberation of our communities.

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The Brotherhood/Sister SOL

The Brotherhood/Sister Sol offers a safe space full of resources and love for Black and Latino youth to speak their minds, acquire knowledge and skills, explore their identity and beliefs, and receive support to make their dreams reality.

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The Caucus of Rank and File  Educators (CORE)

A group of dedicated teachers, retirees, PSRPs and other champions of public education. We will democratize the Chicago Teacher’s Union and turn it into an organization that fights on behalf of its members and the students we teach.

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The Door

The Door provides college advisement and tutoring through a program called Talent Search. Talent Search can provide the support and guidance you need to make your way to graduation, college and beyond. Our goal is to inform you about all of the opportunities available to you, no matter your current grade.

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The Edible Schoolyard

The mission of the Edible Schoolyard at Martin Luther King, Jr. Middle School is to create and sustain an organic garden and landscape that is wholly integrated into the school’s curriculum and lunch program. It involves the students in all aspects of farming the garden – along with preparing, serving and eating the food – as a means of awakening their senses and encouraging awareness and appreciation of the transformative values of nourishment, community, and stewardship of the land.

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The Highlander Center

Highlander serves as a catalyst for grassroots organizing and movement building in Appalachia and the South. We work with people fighting for justice, equality and sustainability, supporting their efforts to take collective action to shape their own destiny. Through popular education, participatory research, and cultural work, we help create spaces — at Highlander and in local communities — where people gain knowledge, hope and courage, expanding their ideas of what is possible. We develop leadership and help create and support strong, democratic organizations that work for justice, equality and sustainability in their own communities and that join with others to build broad movements for social, economic and restorative environmental change.

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The Historical Society of Pennsylvania

The society is one of the largest family history libraries in the nation, has preeminent printed collections on Pennsylvania and regional history, and offers superb manuscript collections renowned for their strength in 17th-, 18th-, and 19th-century history. With the addition of the holdings of The Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies in 2002 (and those of The Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania in 2006 through a Strategic Alliance Agreement), the society has become a chief center for the documentation and study of the ethnic communities and immigrant experiences shared by people whose American history began more recently-between the late 19th century and our own times.

Browse by Exploring Diversity in Pennsylvania History | Pennsylvania’s New Immigrants | Abortion, Anti-Slavery, and the Underground Railroad

The Martin Luther King Jr.

The King Institute’s Liberation Curriculum (LC) initiative seeks to inform teachers and students about global efforts to achieve social justice, human rights and liberation through nonviolent means, with special emphasis on the modern African American freedom struggle.

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The Weary Blues: Langston Hughes and Bessie Smith

This lesson plan examines the development of the Blues in the US.

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The Zinn Education Project: Teaching a People’s History

The Zinn Education Project promotes and supports the use of Howard Zinn’s best-selling book A People’s History of the United States and other materials for teaching a people’s history in middle and high school classrooms across the country. The Zinn Education Project is coordinated by two non-profit organizations, Rethinking Schools and Teaching for Change.

Explore Racism by Time Period |Explore by Theme

Tuskegee Tragedy: A Webcast Exploring the Powerful and their Victim

This lesson plan tells the story of the Tuskegee Experiments

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Understanding Prejudice

This page contains links to teaching ideas, materials, and resources, including more than 35 college-level classroom activities and student assignments. For interactive web-based exercises and demonstrations, please click on the “Exercises and Demonstrations” button to the left.

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Understanding Stereotypes

This is lesson plan is designed to help students understand how assumptions can lead to stereotypes and unfair judgments about individuals and groups. Furthermore, it is created to help students understand how stereotypes and biases affect our lives.

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