Principal Fires Security Guards and Invests in Arts Programs; Transforms School!

Like many schools around the country, Roxbury, MA’s Orchard Gardens was plagued by violence, lack of organization, and falling test scores.

Then school principal Andrew Bott (the 6th in seven years) came along and changed everything.

He immediately fired the school’s many security guards, and invested that money into art teachers, programs, and facilities.

LZ Granderson: Treat Chicago Gangs as Terrorists

A powerful editorial by LZ Granderson calls for a new way of framing the rising tide of violence in Chicago.

According to Granderson, there is very little difference between the impact of an act of terror like the Boston Marathon bombing, and the terror experienced by young people in communities carved up into gang territories.

Our youth are unsafe, afraid to go to school, and afraid to walk the streets of their own neighborhoods.

Why doesn’t America fight gang violence with the same sense of urgency with which it combats terrorism?

George Bush Says “There’s No Need to Defend Myself” Regarding Legacy

As the unveiling of his presidential library approaches, former President George W. Bush is doubling down on his legacy.

In an interview with USA Today, Bush asserted that he has no reason to apologize for or defend any of his actions (or inaction) during his controversial presidency.

Friends and relatives say Bush is “totally at peace” with his time in office.

Muslim Woman Attacked After Boston Bombings

Heba Abolaban – a Muslim woman living in Boston – was attacked by a crazed man two days after the bombings at the Boston Marathon.

Abolaban was walking with a friend when a man punched her in the shoulder, and began yelling at her.

From NewsOne:

“He was screaming, ‘F*** you Muslims! You are terrorists! I hate you! You are involved in the Boston explosions! F*** you!’” Abolaban said. “Oh my lord, I was extremely shocked.”

Editorial Asks “Where Are Ordinary Black Youth in Popular Culture?”

Media depictions of black youth are more often than not deeply problematic.

Young black people are often presented as either the exceptional overachiever or the “lazy, dangerous thug.” The media seemingly has no interest in the spectrum of experiences and perspectives of young black people.

A recent editorial asks the question, “Where Are Ordinary Black Youth in Popular Culture?”