Jahana Hayes Barack Obama

President Obama Introduced National Teacher Of the Year

Jahana Hayes, a history teacher at John F. Kennedy High School in Waterbury, Conn., didn’t even think she would become a teacher when she was growing up, better yet the National Teacher of the Year. But with the help of some teachers in her own life, she was able to set higher standards for herself than what was expected in her local community.

Now, Hayes not only excels in the classroom, but encourages students to play a role in their neighborhoods through community service and fundraising, according to the Root.

AUSTIN, TX - MARCH 11:  President Barack Obama speaks at the opening Keynote during the 2016 SXSW Music, Film + Interactive Festival at Long Center on March 11, 2016 in Austin, Texas.

President Obama Is The First President to Speak at SXSW

For the first time ever in its 30-year history, a sitting president spoke at South by Southwest.

President Obama walked on stage as a keynote speaker to open the Interactive section of the SXSW Festival on Friday, March 11, 2016 in Austin, Texas where he talked about 21st century civic engagement alongside the founder, editor, and CEO of Texas Tribune, Evan Smith. Not only was this awesome because of our amazing president, but also because he is the first president to ever deliver a keynote address at the South by Southwest Conference.

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Hits and misses of President Obama’s final State of the Union address

Tuesday night was President Barack Obama’s last State of the Union.

Appropriate for the moment, his speech was retrospective, examining the work he was able to accomplish, and some of his shortcomings, over the past eight years.

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What to watch for during President Obama’s last State of the Union

Today we begin to mark the end of President Barack Obama’s administration with his final State of the Union address to the nation.

At 9 p.m. EST, the president will call us together again, but with more freedom with what he can say than in times past. Here are a few things we’re thinking about leading up to tonight:

Rudy Giuliani: I’m Not Racist, President Obama’s Mother Was White

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Facing criticism from stating that President Obama doesn’t love America, Giuliani countered by saying that his statement wasn’t racist because President Obama’s mother was white.

From the New York Times:

“Some people thought it was racist — I thought that was a joke, since he was brought up by a white mother, a white grandfather, went to white schools, and most of this he learned from white people,” Mr. Giuliani said in the interview. “This isn’t racism. This is socialism or possibly anti-colonialism.”

Read more at the New York Times

 

Two leaders, different styles

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The following post was published in the New York Times. It was written by Peter Baker and Matt Apuzzo. 

By:  Peter Baker and Matt Apuzzo

The two men in open-collar shirts sat facing each other, papers and a BlackBerry strewn on a coffee table, sober looks on both their faces. One leaned forward, gesturing with his left hand, clearly doing the talking. The other sat back in his chair, two fingers pressed to his temple as he listened intently.

When violence erupted last week after a police shooting in Missouri, President Obama and Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. huddled on Martha’s Vineyard where both were on vacation. But as the most powerful African-Americans in the nation confront its enduring racial divide, they come at it from fundamentally different backgrounds and points of view.

School of Thought

Last week, The Wall Street Journal was the first to report on the Obama Administration’s latest initiative. Not to be outdone by The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, the administration has announced a sequel of its own featuring children competing. The POTUS et. al. has ponied up an addition $100 million in federal funds to public high schools.

From Edweek:

[T]he competition is shaping up to be a mix between the federal Race to the Top and Investing in Innovation programs, and will be funded and run through the Department of Labor. Between 25 and 40 grants will be awarded next year for high schools that team up with colleges and employers. The grants will range in size from $2 million to $7 million. Just as with the i3 competition, winners will have to secure private matching funds of at least 25 percent to get their grant.

Awards are expected to be made in early 2014 so schools can implement their winning plans during the 2014-15 school year. And importantly, the Labor Department will make the rules and administer the program—not the Education Department.

Applicants must include, at a minimum, a local education agency, a local workforce investment system entity, an employer, and an institution of higher education.

So, part deux of public schools competing for public funds. Awesome idea. But boring, right? Seriously, what fun is a competition if the American people can’t see it? We love a a contest. But more importantly, we love watching a contest. So, how about we take this salve and spice it up a bit right? Here’s my thinking: