Report: Rates of breast cancer, fatality rise among black women

White women have held the highest rates of breast cancer in the U.S., but rates are rising among black women.

According to a report released by the American Cancer Society, from 2006 through 2010, breast cancer rates increased 0.2 percent among black women.

The rates remained stable among white women.

From U.S. News & World Report

White women still have more cases of breast cancer, however, with about 127 cases per 100,000 compared with 118 cases per 100,000 black women. But deaths from breast cancer are more common among blacks, according to the report published Oct. 1 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. The gap is closing most among women aged 50 to 59 years old, and the reasons why aren’t clear, the researchers say. “Even with all the attention and awareness raised around breast cancer, the incidence of the disease holds steady,” said Dr. Stephanie Bernik, chief of surgical oncology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Grieving Daughters Kicked Out of Mall for “F— Cancer” Shirts

After losing their mother to cancer, Makia Underwood, 32, Zakia Clark, 29, and Tasha Clark, 27 began wearing shirts and hats with “F— Cancer” emblazoned on the front, with a breast cancer ribbon replacing the ‘C.”

It was a therapeutic way to address a deeply painful experience.

While shopping at Philadelphia’s King of Prussia Mall for a dress for Zakia’s 9 year-old daughter to wear at her grandmother’s funeral, a security guard took issue with the message on their hats, and demanded that they take them off or leave.

When Zakia refused, seven more guards surrounded them.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness and Domestic Violence Awareness: But Are We Truly Aware of Both??

So, I am sitting here trying to understand why during the month of October Breast Cancer Awareness gets more media attention and corporate sponsorship than Domestic Violence Awareness which is also remembered during the month of October. I know that most women have breast irrespective of their size, pigmentation, and function. And, I also know 1 of 8 women will be diagnosed with some form of breast cancer. However, what I am having a hard time trying to understand is why it seems to be favored, if one could favor one personal disaster over another, over domestic violence especially when 1 of 4 women will experience some form of domestic violence in their lifetime meaning women are more likely to be exposed to domestic violence than breast cancer.

This acknowledgement is not to reduce the level of attention Breast Cancer Awareness’ initiatives receive because it is important. And, evermore important to me because a couple of months ago my “beloved” godmother was diagnosed with it which caused me to become a consumer of all things related to curing Breast Cancer. However, as a survivor of domestic violence—lived through my mother’s daily beatings—and goddaughter of a breast cancer survivor, I see the interconnections and similarities between both issues and why they must be addressed simultaneously.