California professor committed to improving strained relationship between police, black community wins prestigious genius grant

 

A professor whose research is helping a California police department improve its tense relationship with the black community is among 21 winners of this year’s MacArthur Foundation “genius grants.”

The Chicago -based foundation announced the 2014 recipients on Wednesday, who will each receive $625,000 to spend any way they want. 

BYP100 on how you can end police brutality in your community

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The following post originally appears on The Grio. It was written by BYP100’s  National Coordinator Charlene Carruthers and BYP100 member Terrance Laney.

By: Charlene Carruthers & Terrance Laney

President Barack Obama’s statements on the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, left many young black folks feeling that  the administration was either unwilling or inept at addressing racial injustice in the United States.

While the focus on America’s first black president is understandable, it has unfortunately provided every mayor, city council and police department with the cover they need to continue to refuse to implement common sense reforms that would keep everyone safe from police misconduct and abuse of power.

16-year-old opens gym in neighborhood to combat violence

 

 

16-year-old high school athlete Ross Torrance saw what was happening in his community and decided to help make a change.

Torrance, from Miami, opened a gym in his neighborhood to help people in the area get fit. He hopes to give people in his neighborhood access to gym equipment that would help them lead healthier lives and provide space that is free from the violence he sees in his community.

Chicago Film festival tells stories of black LGBTQ community

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For two days residents and visitors of Chicago will have the chance to experience unique films dedicated to showcasing works by and about the Black LGBTQ/SGL (same gender loving) community.

The Black Alphabet Film Festival, hosted by the non profit Black Alphabet, features a series of independent films that tell the stories of black LGBTQ members. 

Why the Banjee Black Gurl’s Brunch is a safe space

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By: Terrence Chappell

This past Sunday, June 8, I hosted a brunch at my apartment in Chicago’s Edgewater community. I absolutely love having friends over and entertaining. I grew up watching my mom entertain, so this brunch brought it full circle, of course with the help of a few of her hosting secrets and nick-knacks. However, this brunch was a little different from past things I have hosted at my place. Comically titled A Banjee Black Gurl’s Brunch: BAPs Edition (Chapter 4), the brunch was a social outlet for gay black men to connect and enjoy one another.