Mobbin In Heels: Not Forgetting About Womyn in Hip Hop

Much has changed for the presence of female emcees since the days of Sha-Rock (I know I’m taking it way back), but the struggle for respect remains nearly impossible. None of my reflections can pin-point the reason why no female emcee has managed to have the world-wide success of Kanye West, for example. These thoughts come to mind in light of new unsigned hype from Baltimore, Mobbin Morty. Her prosperous embodiment of a hardcore leafy persona—the type of Hip Hop reminiscent of Wiz Khalifa, Curren$y and Dom Kennedy—has me in awe. She does me one better though, her ownership of female sexuality flows interchangeably with her grassy stilo. Hands down she offers way more lyrically than Lil Kim, so I wonder if her music can take her where no female emcee has ever gone.

Hip Hop's Smoking Section: Room for Collective Dreams

 

Does anyone else find it so cool that Curren$y and Wiz Khalifa show love to each other on their songs? Every now and then, you can hear a Taylor [m/] joint beginning with “shout out to my brotha Spitta”; or, on the low, you can catch Spitta quoting Wiz like, “we aint trippin’ cuz we’ll get there in a minute”. And get this, these songs were not features, each a solo on their popular mixtape and album! Even seeing Big Sean and Juicy J in Wiz’s “Reefer Party” video contributes to this thematic change in the perception of Hip Hop. I’m talking about collectives here, the rhythmic equivalent of the Justice League. Normatively, Hip Hop heads, young and old, are used to the politics of beefs, but nowadays, with the help of video journals and marijuana legislation, us heads experience our favorite artists as a community.