Video of Sharkeisha assaulting innocent bystander leads to arrest of viral sensation

shakeisha

A brutal clip of a 17-year-old girl getting beat by a schoolmate has led to the assailant’s arrest. ShaMichael Manuel was struck in the face by her schoolmate only known as Sharkeisha during a conversation last month.

The video,  like most clips depicting young people of color engaging in acts of violence, appeared on the popular website World Star Hip Hop. 

Sharkeisha has been taken into custody regarding the incident.

Raising Girls in Public

This week has been the week of concern for young girls everywhere. From the death of Whitney and the fear of the consequences for her daughter to the examples of Too $hort and RiRi, it is no question why many are in distress. In an age where youth regardless of gender are tuned into the media almost as much as they are into school, there has to be a bigger to do about the lessons they are being taught. It cannot be a question of whether or not the intent is to represent a role model but more so a realization that youth will emulate who and what they perceive to be cool. Like it is said, with great power comes great responsibility. 

“There’s a stirring in My Soul”: Conservatives have an Anti-Woman Agenda up their Sleeve

Like most children, I told lies when I was a little black girl. I told big lies. I told small lies. I told white lies. I told lies. And, even had the audacity to argue with my “all seeing all knowing” do-as-I-say-not-as-I-do black grandmother about the usage of lie over her usage of “telling a story.” What does telling a story have to do with telling a lie? I tell you, this infuriated me. I prefer the word lie. Even though my grandmother and I had many disagreements over the terming of untruths often leaving my backside sore with resentment, she had a remarkable almost supernatural way of knowing when I, her precocious granddaughter, was telling her a lie. She would say with a type of black woman resolve, There’s a stirring in the pot . . . there’s a stirring in my soul,” and before she could finish her statement I knew she knew that I had lied. And, boy did my sore backside know it too. And, so in the tradition of my no nonsense black grandmother, I say, “There’s a stirring in the pot . . . there’s a stirring in my soul that something is amidst in Conservatives—religious fundamentalist, Republicans, Tea Party Members—grand desire to restrict or completely annihilate US’ women’s right to choose.

Just Because They’re Big…

I have really big boobs. They are humongous. I’m a shade over five feet tall with enough rack for three women. They draw a ton of attention. This, I know. But just because they’re huge does not mean we all get to touch them or remark about them. Thanks.

One of my mentees has been coming into her form lately and it has drawn a lot of unwanted attention from her family, friends, and strange older men. I’ve dealt with it most of my life. It’s not fun when you’re 13 years old and you don’t quite understand what’s going on with your body.  It’s even less fun when everyone around you deems it appropriate to make jokes, poke or grab at them.

I Know Why Black Men act the Way they Act: Peter Pan Syndrome!!

As I walked home yesterday from the market with my several bags of groceries and my godson in toe being harassed by young black men who probably could be my nephews, I finally understood why many Black men act the way they do. Why they are completely impervious to emotions. Why they can sleep with countless numbers of women and men and deny their sexuality. Why they have so much free time to harass me as I walk down the street (al. holding constant the double digit unemployment rate in the black community). Why they can walk away from raising their children. Yes, I know why they act the way they act. It’s pretty simple. They have no social responsibility and by extension no emotional responsibility.

Why You Should Be Taking Tyler, the Creator and Kreayshawn Seriously

Last Saturday night, Kreayshawn and the White Girl Mob played a sold-out gig in Hollywood. And according to Spin Magazine, it was an insane show.

“…the audience rushed the stage where they proceeded to completely freak out — bouncing, stripping, cooking, and flipping into the crowd — until the music was done and they were forced bodily from the limelight by the venue’s security. It was intensely electric.”

The next day, she hit the VMAs, where she was nominated (and a favorite) for the Best New Artist Award. She lost to like-minded and equally controversial Tyler, the Creator. Like Kreayshawn, Tyler and Odd Future rose to prominence through YouTube, blogs and social media, don’t fit in any radio format, and have sharply divided critics and fans.

A lot of people aren’t taking Kreayshawn and Odd Future seriously. And that’s understandable. When something comes along that is so alien to mainstream standards and tastes, it always gets dismissed.

But don’t be fooled. Their success is organic and real; not some record label’s scheme. The rise of artists like Odd Future and Kreayshawn (as well as Lil B and Waka Flocka Flame) is subversive to Hip Hop’s status quo. And it might end up being a big deal.