Study: ‘Hip Hop’ students unfairly targeted

According to a recent study, black and Latino “hip-hop” students are disproportionately punished in urban schools.

The study’s lead researcher and Michigan State University Assistant Professor of Education Muhammad Khalifa found that students who identified with hip-hop culture were often removed from school because of their dress and cultural behaviors.

Harvard hip-hop fellowship named after Nas, rapper gives benediction

Nas made his first appearance at Harvard University on Thursday and the rapper wasn’t performing. He was on campus to give his blessing to a new fellowship named in his honor.

The Nasir Jones Hip Hop Fellowship will be awarded to two scholars or artists annually. Recipients will be chosen by a Harvard faculty committee.

From New York Times:

 It is primarily a research fellowship, although Marcyliena Morgan, a professor of African and African American Studies and the founder and director of the Hip-Hop Archive and Research Institute, which will administer the fellowship, said on Friday that fellows could teach courses as well. The application process, she said, has just started.

Video Killed the Radio Star

Two days ago, Mister Cee resigned from his position as a DJ at New York City’s HOT97. The embattled radio personality, who played an integral role in the careers of two of the best to have ever done it (Kane and Biggie) resigned after a video emerged of him engaging in a conversation with a transgender person, wherein he was debating the prices for sexual acts. This incident echos a previous one: Mister Cee was arrested for soliciting an undercover officer earlier this year. At that time, Mister Cee attempted to quell any questions regarding his sexuality by staunchly vocalizing his heterosexuality. This time, however, Mister Cee not only resigned, but appeared on HOT97 yesterday to speak more about his internal struggle about his sexuality. His statement of resignation reads:

J. Cole on Colorism: “I might not be as successful as I am now if I was dark skin”

In a recent interview with BET, rapper J. Cole sounded off on a variety of heavy issues, including racial profiling and homophobia in Hip Hop.

One topic of conversation that is seldom discussed in Hip Hop is the issue of colorism.

Cole says his privilege as a lighter-skinned person has probably helped him to get where he is today.