This Cover of TIME Came and Went, but it has a Message for Our Movement

On the cover of TIME Magazine’s special February edition is a faceless white man behind bars. At first glance, I assumed this was an issue about millionaires and billionaires who deserve jail time for getting over on society, but after a double take I saw that it is actually about wrongful convictions, celebrating 25 years of the Innocence Project.

Why You Can’t Understand Black History Without a Critique of Capitalism

Many of our Black history idols have been immortalized for their work against racism carried out by whites, from the federal government on down. They have been applauded for their magical strengths and abilities to overcome insurmountable odds. Their legacies are contextualized through brief chapters in k-12 history classes, where examples of racism are narrowed down to physical harm and explicit parameters that describe what Black people could and couldn’t do “a long time ago”. As a result, many of us were socialized to understand Black history in a way that has been whitewashed or sanitized. The stories we are fed as young people that immortalized, or mainstreamed, our Black figures of inspiration conveniently left out important details, such as the anti-capitalist leanings of their work.

We are in a time where need the full story of the experiences and perspectives of our ancestors, and we need to reclaim those radical beliefs so that we can create space for true progress not just against racism, but also against capitalism.

5 Things I Would Rather Write About than Donald Trump

I write for The Black Youth Project blog about twice a week. I love news media and think a free and fair press is essential to holding centers of power accountable. But it seems like, as of late, the only center of power dominating the press cycle is dumpster fire of a president Donald Trump.

Now, I have covered Trump. Extensively. And I believe it is my job as a political writer, particularly someone with the perspective of political science, to highlight the injustices and incompetence of the Trump administration.

Base To Dems: Get With It Or Get Lost

What do you call a party that refuses to represent the interests of its base in an increasingly critical time in U.S. politics?

Soon to be over.

Since the beginning of this decade, the Democratic Party has continuously grown more and more out of touch with their base. We saw it in the 2014 midterms, when the decision to swing to the center and distance themselves from Obama resulted in sound defeat in Congressional races. We saw it in the heavily contested Democratic primary, as more and more traditionally left-leaning people began to critique, if not outright reject, the political establishment.

Remembering Our Black Radical History: The MOVE 9

On May 13, 1985, Philadelphia city leadership and the Philadelphia Police Department carried out an attack on a group of Black radical individuals and families, bombing and killing 11 people – including 5 children. The group was the MOVE organization, founded by John Africa and emphasizes family and our life’s connection to nature – the attack was carried out after years of mounting tensions between the police and MOVE.

4 Ways to Deal with Politically Different Family this Holiday

This holiday season, many of us will return home to our families, who, even though they love us very much and we love them, may hold different political beliefs. It won’t be easy.

The current political moment is an especially tough one if you or your loved ones voted for different presidential candidates back in November. In order to get through this holiday season not only dealing with politically different family, but truly enjoying yourself and your time together, here are 4 tips to breeze through the holidays with family who may not be so “woke.”

Why America Needs Justice-Oriented Civic Education Now More Than Ever

The United Negro Improvement Association. The Congress of Racial Equity. The Southern Christian Leadership Conference. The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. The National Association of Colored Women. The National Association For the Advancement of Colored People. The Black Panther Party.

The list of civic organizations that helped shape the course of racial justice in the 20th century seems almost endless.

The Complexities of Revolution We Can Learn from Fidel Castro

On Friday, the world learned that Fidel Castro, at 90 years old, had died. Over the days since, I have learned more about both the revolutionary and the tyrant than I did in school. Honestly, I have more questions than answers.

I am by no means an expert on Fidel Castro or the longstanding political conditions in Cuba but I do believe that we should advance radical ideas in the pursuit of justice; and to do so, we have to study.