Two leaders, different styles

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The following post was published in the New York Times. It was written by Peter Baker and Matt Apuzzo. 

By:  Peter Baker and Matt Apuzzo

The two men in open-collar shirts sat facing each other, papers and a BlackBerry strewn on a coffee table, sober looks on both their faces. One leaned forward, gesturing with his left hand, clearly doing the talking. The other sat back in his chair, two fingers pressed to his temple as he listened intently.

When violence erupted last week after a police shooting in Missouri, President Obama and Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. huddled on Martha’s Vineyard where both were on vacation. But as the most powerful African-Americans in the nation confront its enduring racial divide, they come at it from fundamentally different backgrounds and points of view.

Identity Crisis

Between Reality TV, Media Pressure and Social Status, we now live in a world where people feel the need to live in someone else’s shoes. We have leaders walking around as followers and followers perpetrating as leaders. This comes from a lack of personal and cultural Identity. This is a battle that a lot of us have struggled with and some of us even find ourselves now.

Style Wars: Not Graffiti But Hipster Takeover

Style, or the way we construct our dress, seems capable to achieve political goals—equal to the power of protests. Speaking from experience, I did not know that my clothes upset the authority figures. Since my professor claimed that I was funny-looking last night, I’ve found a complement in my teacher’s words. Where he was speaking from started at a position, of a certain way of looking at the body. Each new generation violates the laws for presenting the body of the previous generation. This historical function should reveal another strategy for change, another method of power. 

Getting Past Youth Terrorism

So I’m sick and tired of conversations about the state of Black youth ending with the same played-out solutions—restoring strong family values. Now don’t get me wrong, of course family is important, but we are mistaken if we think that broken homes are the main factors fueling gang violence. If we should blame anything it should be the freedom of humyn kind. That’s right, all moral impositions—respect, honest work, luck—remain fluid and vulnerable to one’s departure. It’s the social situation that determines the logic and integrity of any value.

The Power of Words

In a time where words are abbreviated into consonants and symbols and three letters can signal an entire sentence, it becomes interesting to look at language in depth. Whether our ‘wyd’ for “what are you doing?” is a reflection of life lived on the go or a need for differentiation, our words and phrases change faster than Merriam & Webster can look up aardvark in the dictionary. How often do we analyze the reason behind our speech or think before we speak to choose our words meticulously? We are constantly deciphering messages from those around us via the internet, television, and in person. It may be useful to probe the source of our daily thoughts, conscious and subconscious, received through our constant contact with others.

Recently, I saw a movie called Waking Life, which posed various questions about our world and below is the clip on language.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oRQLoluXvY