BLACKS SHOULD NOT ‘KNOW BETTER,’ AND HERE’S WHY

It’s been over five hundred years since the first enslaved Blacks arrived in the United States. I wish I could say that I expect this society to recognize Black humanity, but I know better. It’s been a long time since those first enslaved Blacks arrived in South Carolina, but as much as things have changed some things have painfully stayed the same.

The topic of Black humanity has been on my mind for some time now. I want to address what I feel is one of the covert forms of white supremacist thinking operating in our society today. The sentiment in question isn’t the kind of white supremacist thinking that many of us have been trained to spot. Unlike the sentiment that “all Blacks are criminals,” it doesn’t announce it’s arrival. What I am talking about is a sentiment that is sadly supported by Black and non-Black alike. The sentiment that Blacks “should know better” when it comes to prejudice against other groups. It is this sentiment that I want to examine in this essay, and hopefully show how it is a product of white supremacist thinking.

Spilling Whitney’s Tea Redux

Since I have done nothing but act like my mother’s child and mourn the passing of Whitney Houston for the last 10 days, I knew today’s post would be a return, in some way, to The Voice. Early last week, I had resolved to write a fun, lighter post, tentatively titled, “Whitney: Anatomy of a Diva,” where I post videos of Whitney singing with other, clearly lesser singers and offer commentary.

But that will have to wait.

After last Monday’s post, I got a really thoughtful and thought-provoking email asking about whether or not it was too soon discuss the nature of Whitney’s relationship with her former assistant, Robyn Crawford. It took me a few days to respond, because I thought I was deeply ambivalent about the matter. In reply, I questioned the impulse to posthumously out folks, and wondered if we had not found other ways to validate our own sexuality. I made that last claim with a little trepidation, because although I don’t find being able to identify with a celebrity in such a way helpful to my own self-esteem, I must acknowledge that others feel differently. (Moreover, I must readily confess that my addiction to poorly produced webseries starring lesbians of color does not stem solely from my thirst for things to hate on.)

On the Job While You Chill: The Profit of Oppresion

Let’s talk about empathy. Why? Because intersectionality–this concept that all isms have the same perpetrator and depend upon each other to oppress various groups/identities–never struck me hard until i thought critically about this erroneous course in sexuality I’m taking. Granted, I disagree with most of my professor’s outdated perspectives, i still give partial credence to my professor for making me play the opposition (perceive my position as a member of an oppressive group, men). Having to defend the intentions of masculinity, and thereby seriously embodying an emblem of manhood, brought me to a more intimate proximity with the grievances of a womyn’s experience. The final acknowledgement of subversive interactions with womyn, that rarely is the object of contemplation, strengthened my advocacy for an intersected approach to deconstructing an exploitative system.

NICKI MINAJ and THE FREAKY BOIS: Raunch-Rap As A Weapon

Big Sean’s new video for “Dance (A$$) Remix” is….okay. But Nicki Minaj’s incredibly raunchy guest verse on “Dance (A$$) Remix” is waaaaay better than ok.

Check out the video (NSFW):

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pn1VGytzXus

Minaj has perfected the art of what I’ll call raunch-rap. In a male-dominated genre, she owns her sexuality; declaring her sexual desires frankly and unapologetically, while mocking the public’s obsession with her body. Her performance is a stroke of subversive genius, and it immediately reminded me of YouTube sensations The Freaky Bois; two young gay rappers that spit the nastiest, sleaziest, freakiest raps you’ve ever heard.

Like Nicki, The Freaky Bois achieve more than just shock and awe with these songs. They’re wielding raunchy rap music like a weapon, forcing the listener to grapple with their sexual identities. You can either deal with it, or listen to something else. No compromises. No apologies.

And I love it.

Here’s just a sample of The Freaky Bois’ work (NSFW):

Mobbin In Heels: Not Forgetting About Womyn in Hip Hop

Much has changed for the presence of female emcees since the days of Sha-Rock (I know I’m taking it way back), but the struggle for respect remains nearly impossible. None of my reflections can pin-point the reason why no female emcee has managed to have the world-wide success of Kanye West, for example. These thoughts come to mind in light of new unsigned hype from Baltimore, Mobbin Morty. Her prosperous embodiment of a hardcore leafy persona—the type of Hip Hop reminiscent of Wiz Khalifa, Curren$y and Dom Kennedy—has me in awe. She does me one better though, her ownership of female sexuality flows interchangeably with her grassy stilo. Hands down she offers way more lyrically than Lil Kim, so I wonder if her music can take her where no female emcee has ever gone.

A Message To Black LBGT Youth On National Coming Out Day

Today is National Coming Out Day; a celebration of the bravery it takes to come out, and the positive impact it can have on the LGBT community at large.

The Black Youth Project wishes our readers a wonderful and liberating Coming Out Day. If you do choose this is to be the day that you reveal your sexuality to family or friends, we want you to know that you have our love and support.

And feel free to send us your “Coming Out” stories. Hearing about your personal journey can make a world of difference to a young, struggling LBGT youth looking for some type of affirmation or hope.

However, we also want to make it very clear that all of us – regardless of age, gender, race or socioeconomic status – are on our own journeys.

Nobody knows the best time for you to come out BUT YOU.

I Know Why Black Men act the Way they Act: Peter Pan Syndrome!!

As I walked home yesterday from the market with my several bags of groceries and my godson in toe being harassed by young black men who probably could be my nephews, I finally understood why many Black men act the way they do. Why they are completely impervious to emotions. Why they can sleep with countless numbers of women and men and deny their sexuality. Why they have so much free time to harass me as I walk down the street (al. holding constant the double digit unemployment rate in the black community). Why they can walk away from raising their children. Yes, I know why they act the way they act. It’s pretty simple. They have no social responsibility and by extension no emotional responsibility.

Game Theory #Pause

Not that I pay that much attention to hip-hop anymore, but rapper, [The] Game (when did he drop the article?) spoke out recently about gays and hip-hop, and I noticed. And by “notice” I mean someone mentioned it to me and I bothered to Google it. Call it preparation for LGBTQ History Month.

In case you were wondering or concerned, “Game don’t have a problem with gay people.” Let’s all take a moment and release that collective sigh of relief. I wish I could follow that quote with “The Game don’t have a problem with not making albums anymore,” but that would be a lie–or a wish. Take your pick. But I digress. So, yeah, The Game don’t have a problem with gay people, but he does have a problem with believing myths and spreading them as if they are factually correct. The Game may not have a problem with the gays–and by gays The Game seems to speak exclusively about gay men–but he does have a problem with closeted men sleeping with straight women and consequently spreading AIDS to straight men who, I guess, would otherwise not have gotten caught up. This theory, as many of us know, has gained the appellation, “The Down Low Myth,” and several blogs have responded to The Game’s comments by refuting his argument. I support those efforts. And I hope those fans of The Game (because, seriously, who else was paying attention) who believed his words read those responses and gained some clarity. There was, however, something that the pundits missed, and I’d like to address it here.