Chief Keef says new mixtape will ‘raise the murder rate’

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Since being discovered on YouTube in 2012, Chicago-based rapper Chief Keef has become one of the most talked about performers by the masses. You would think that it would be for his music, (T.I. did call him “the voice of the young generation”) *sideye, but most of the publicity is in result of Chief Keef’s controversial statements and involvement with crime.

His latest comment appears to be taking claim for the city’s high murder rate.

Coming from where I’m from

drivebyAfter reading a recent New York Times article featuring a north Saint Louis neighborhood and the violence that it’s citizens live with daily, I realize that I see my neighborhood with different eyes. I am a born and raise resident of the same north Saint Louis neighborhood. Like most of my neighbors, I have witnessed or been a victim of crime in our neighborhood. Folks always ask my family and me “Why don’t you move?” We always reply, “Why? What will happen when all the good folks are gone?”

Knockout: anything but a game

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Lately, our teenagers have started to play a violent game. “Knockout” is when a person, who is usually walking alone, gets randomly attacked, often punched in the face by at least one person. It could be a boy or a girl, man or woman, homeless person or even the local UPS delivery man. No one is safe, and the game is anything but funny to the victims and those of us who know better.

Chicago Park District Presents: “The Blueprint: Teen Summit & Forum”

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The Chicago Park District will hold a free event for teens ages 13-19 on the city’s west side. The summit will consist of workshops, panel discussions, spoken word and dance performances, and more.

In addition to providing a plethora of resources for urban teens, “The Blueprint” will feature interactive conversations that teens face daily such as violence, economic strife and peer pressure. 

BREAKING: 3 shot outside Pittsburg high school

Three teens were shot as students were dismissed from a Pittsburgh school Wednesday afternoon.

Police, including members of the SWAT team, surrounded Brashear High School in the town’s Beecview community following the shooting.

From Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:

Major crimes unit Lt. Kevin Kraus said [four] people are being taken to headquarters to be questioned by homicide detectives. He did not clarify their connection to the investigation.

Community members hold funeral to “bury violence in Newark”

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The murder rate in Newark, N.J., has risen dramatically. The city is considered one of the most dangerous in the country, despite Mayor Cory Booker’s oversight and crime reduction measures.

Violence among youth of color is particularly prevalent, with Newark being recently rated in the top 10 murder capitals.

While the violence appears to not be ceasing, community members and activists in the city are making a powerful statement: by holding a funeral to bury violence in the city.

Graduation: Voices and Images of Chicago Youth Violence

This is an introduction to a series of ongoing posts featuring youth voices and images from Graduation, a multimedia project about Chicago youth violence. I hope to create a collection of youth voices working to create positive change, break negative stereotypes and provide insight into Chicago violence while challenging current social issues.

 

In 2010 I began collecting newspaper clippings about Chicago youth violence, and the growing number of youth killings haunted me. I knew I wanted to do something but I wasn’t sure what kind of impact I could make.  In 2011 reality struck closer to home when my cousin Cam was killed to gun violence.  Although Cam wasn’t a youth, seeing the grief and irreversible devastation my family experienced made my urge to make a difference stronger.

Radio piece explores invisible gang lines

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If you grew up on the wrong side of the tracks, then you know about the invisible border.

It’s a well-known line that doesn’t have to be etched in white chalk, because its existence lies deep within the eyes of everyone living in gang territory.

Gangs are particularly prevalent in Chicago, and the Little Village community is no exception.

Jacqueline Serrato is an alum of the Vocalo storytelling workshops. In her piece, “Border Mentality 26th Street,” she outlines the very real “invisible line” and its affects on the lives of citizens.