Where to Give on this #GivingTuesday

In the activism world, physical presence is important but there’s no denying that financial contributions are just as vital. Given the current climate of the U.S., many communities are fighting injustices at every turn, on every level. This Giving Tuesday, we are asking that you consider supporting organizations that work for justice for all people.

Here is a list of organizations and meaningful efforts that you can invest in on this Giving Tuesday:

Facing Race: Building for Racial Justice In Schools Post-Election

By Nuala Cabral

Last Thursday, over two thousand people from across the country came together in Atlanta for Facing Race, a national conference on racial justice. Organized by the NY-based nonprofit Race Forward, the conference embodies the organization’s mission to “build awareness, solutions, and leadership for racial justice.” The timing of this conference couldn’t have been more perfect; only one day earlier Donald Trump was announced president elect of the United States. The conference, thus, became a space where folks could grieve and process the implications of this destructive election and strategize around ways we can respond.

Love Liberation: A Black Feminist Guide to the Black Panther Party’s 50th Anniversary Conference and Gala

Authored by Angela D. LeBlanc-Ernest, Tracye A. Matthews, Mary Phillips, and Robyn C. Spencer

This article is a part of a two-part series. See Part 2 here.

The Black Panther Party (BPP) has declared 2016 the #yearofthePanther, a year with nationwide events to “reclaim the history and legacy of the BPP and to connect with current organizations.” Founded in 1966, the BPP developed as a political organization committed to the liberation of Black and oppressed people. The Panthers challenged institutional inequities by policing the police and provided much needed resources and services to the community. While they are most recognized for their breakfast program for children, they created over 50 practical community programs and grew into an organization with worldwide impact.

Gabby Douglas And The Right To Be Visibly Disappointed

Losing out on any opportunity is a remarkably frustrating thing to overcome, and any functioning member of society can confirm that. But it may be most pronounced in the athletic world, where anything from scholarship to gold medals and even multi-million dollar endorsements are on the line.

Which is why the slight sulk on Gabby Douglas’ face throughout her second Olympic foray was not at all shocking to me.

This Is What Can Happen When Data Meets The Movement For Black Lives

On July 5, the number on The Guardian’s police killings ticker The Counted went up. On July 6, it went up again. The Guardian, like many other news outlets, with genuine intentions has made the effort to look at the numerous surveys, polls, and research behind racial disparities in policing in the country. My question is: who does the data usually benefit? Even more importantly: what is being done about it?

What’s Happening at the Formation World Tour?

It’s been more than a month since Beyoncé released her second visual album, Lemonade that discussed many personal issues and triumphs like infidelity, female empowerment, and more. She kicked off her tour on April 27 in Miami, Florida and concludes in Nashville, Tennessee. There will be 49 shows in total, 32 in North America and 17 in Europe.

Seeing how DJ Khaled is opening up for her, we know that the show is bound to be something special, even if he’s scared of her.

Denzel Washington Raised $17 Million For The Smithsonian African American History and Culture Museum

Get the right group of Hollywood players in one room and you can do some pretty amazing things. Denzel Washington is one of those people who has the clout and the means to make big things happen for Black communities. And, a recent fundraising party – which led to his helping the Smithsonian African American Museum – is just a real-life example of what that philanthropic spirit in Black Hollywood looks like.

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is set up to open up later this year. But before that can happen, the appropriate funds need to be raised – $540 million, according to the Root. The government has contributed $270 million, but the rest will likely have to come from donors. Which is where Washington and his wife Pauletta come into play.