Artist Makeda Lewis on Luck And Her Now Iconic Afro-Feminist Coloring Book

By: L. G. Parker

By now you’ve heard of Atlanta-based artist Makeda Lewis. The 25-year-old multidisciplinary artist’s Avie’s Dreams, an Afro-Feminist coloring book and surrealist poem, has been celebrated by Saint Heron, Nylon, Blavity and more. In its rich pages, uncolored images are accompanied by introspective words that speak to the artists journey as a person as well as Avie’s self-evolution, the book’s central character.

This Poet’s Tearful ‘I’m Sorry’ Poem Shows Our Continuing Failure To Address Rape

“This apology is a symptom of a social disease seen from football rosters in Ohio to busses in New Delhi. With outbreaks of slut shaming and victim blaming mentalities and no cure in sight under this current system of patriarchy.”

As a survivor, this video was difficult to watch. I imagine it would be hard for anyone to watch a someone begin crying before they can even get through their first few words of poetry. But, this poem is particularly powerful because it not only exposes the language that is so often used to justify, perpetuate, and legitimate rape, it shows the systemic and cultural commitments to rape culture that permeate every level of society and government in the United States. And, the fact that this young womyn has to be the person saying “sorry” for all of it is disgusting.

Call for Submissions: The King Bey Bible

It’s time for poets and essayists to get in formation.

Feminista Jones and Olivia Cole are teaming up to publish an anthology of writing inspired by and dedicated to the one and only Beyoncé: The King Bey Bible. For many, Beyoncé is the human incarnation of the possibility of another world: a world run by Girls! Consider this their interpretation of a “lost text”.

This Powerful Poem Tells The Story of Black Boys Who ‘Die Easy’

The prevalence of violence against young Black people has become a constant phenomenon in American life. While Black folx of all genders face unique struggles with anti-Blackness, police surveillance, and state-sanctioned murder, young Black men are often featured in mainstream media most prominently as victims of these systems and processes of oppression. This poem from Akeem Olaj sums up what it means to be a Black boy, specifically in the South, when so much of their humanity is stolen from them by those who would rather see them in casket than thriving.

This Video Debunks The Myth Of ‘Black On Black Crime’

There are many sayings about Black communities that go unquestioned. One of the most prominent ones is the term “Black on Black crime.” In a new video, The Root is showing exactly why the myth of “Black on Black crime” is completely out of step with the historical racism and segregation that created and diminished many predominantly Black communities in the first place.

Read Alice Walker’s Powerful Poem Inspired By Jesse Williams’ BET Awards Speech

Activists, viewers, and commentators around the country have been talking about Jesse Williams’ iconic speech he gave at the BET Awards this past Sunday. Williams was awarded the Humanitarian of the Year award and spoke candidly about his passion around the preservation of Black lives. Even folks like the acclaimed poet Alice Walker were taken with his words. In his honor, she wrote the poem “Here It Is.”

The poem is important because it highlights the ways that Williams’ skin and eye color does not exclude him from Blackness. Read the full poem below.

Poet Beautifully Details Black Women’s Struggles At PWI’s

While there are sure to be challenges at any kind of institution, the challenges that people of color face at predominantly white institutions (PWI) are a separate story. To take that idea even further, the experiences that black women have at PWIs can be even more stressful.

To detail those exact experiences, Kwyn Townsend Riley performed a poem detailing the 10 “guaranteed experiences” for black women at PWIs, including having people play in their hair, explaining the importance of #SayHerName and constantly having to educate.