5 Things I Would Rather Write About than Donald Trump

I write for The Black Youth Project blog about twice a week. I love news media and think a free and fair press is essential to holding centers of power accountable. But it seems like, as of late, the only center of power dominating the press cycle is dumpster fire of a president Donald Trump.

Now, I have covered Trump. Extensively. And I believe it is my job as a political writer, particularly someone with the perspective of political science, to highlight the injustices and incompetence of the Trump administration.

12-Year-Old Marley Dias To Publish Activism Guide For Kids & Teens

12-year-old Marley Dias continues to impress and make us all wish we would’ve done more with our childhood.

After demanding more diversity in school reading lists, Dias’ #1000BlackGirlBooks took off. The effort saw more than 8,000 donations and resulted in books being donated by the GrassROOTS Community Foundation to far more schools than originally anticipated.

As if that weren’t already enough to put on an amazing college application one day, Scholastic has announced that it will be publishing a book penned by Dias to teach kids and teenagers the basics of activism and using their platforms to spark change. 

Your Digital Toolbox for Justice and Resistance

The look and feel of movements for justice and equity are changing thanks to social media’s ability to spread messages and create access to information, resources, and actions. Pushing these limits of social media use are young people of color and their networks (the ignition of #BlackLivesMatter is an example), as this group finds different ways to spread messages focusing on the things they care about. In this way, communication and movement building tie together by tightly spreading information that can’t as easily be hidden, whitewashed, or ignored. Thus, these young people are creating a digital toolbox for justice.

#JustSaySorry Campaign Lights up Social Media for Sexual Assault Survivors

In recent years, movements to address sexual assault on college campuses have gained attention and achievements across the United States. Activists Wagatwe Wanjuki and Kamilah Willingham are adding their voices to the conversation with their #JustSaySorry campaign, highlighting the importance of colleges acknowledging their failures in addressing sexual violence on campus. In an interview, Wanjuki shared the goals and guiding principles of the campaign.

Why Black Americans Should Still Celebrate This Independence Day

If we aren’t fully free, how do we celebrate this country’s freedom?

Next Monday, Americans all over the world will celebrate Independence Day, the day the thirteen colonies declared their independence from the British crown. On July 5th, 1852, however, Frederick Douglass was not in celebratory mood. In a speech to the Ladies’ Antislavery Society, Douglass discussed the history of Independence Day and acknowledged the bravery of the founders. But he had an important question for his audience, “Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us?” This question still resonates today.

Jesse Williams to Star and Produce Harry Belafonte Biopic

Jesse Williams, the Grey’s Anatomy star will produce and star in a Harry Belafonte biopic. During his appearance on the podcast Denzealots, which was created by comedians W. Kamau Bell and Kevin Avery, Williams talked about how he has a lot of projects coming up including the movie on the Civil Rights activist and notable actor, Harry Belafonte.

Chicago activist becomes first transgender bride to ‘Say Yes to the Dress’

For the first time in the series, TLC’s “Say Yes to the Dress: Atlanta” will be featuring a transgender bride in search of the perfect gown for the wedding of her dreams.

The lucky lady? Precious Davis, an activist from the Hyde Park neighborhood in Chicago. In the new episode which airs on Friday, she will share the story of her romance with Myles Brady, a fellow activist from the same area.

BYP 100 Feature: Black People in New York City Are Not Safe

On February 1, 1968, two Black Memphis sanitation workers were crushed to death when the compactor on their truck was accidentally triggered. It was the last in a series of events that would eventually lead the city’s majority Black sanitation workforce to go on strike, demanding safer work conditions, better wages, and union recognition. What makes this strike even more significant is that these Black workers were fighting for comprehensive economic justice in the context of the 1960s Freedom Struggle, which demanded an end to state-sanctioned racial violence in all its forms.