racism

Young People Disagree On The Issue Of Racism

According to a new poll, young people are divided concerning race in America. Around 80% of African Americans youth ages 18-30 believe that racism remains a major problem, while only 54% of young Whites agree that this is an issue. While a slight majority of young whites surveyed do agree that race is a major issue, this data suggests a wide gap remains between black and white youth’s perceptions of racism. 

Black Lives Matter

This Is What Can Happen When Data Meets The Movement For Black Lives

On July 5, the number on The Guardian’s police killings ticker The Counted went up. On July 6, it went up again. The Guardian, like many other news outlets, with genuine intentions has made the effort to look at the numerous surveys, polls, and research behind racial disparities in policing in the country. My question is: who does the data usually benefit? Even more importantly: what is being done about it?

Picture from Pierre Jean-Louis' Instagram.

Jean-Louis’ Images are a Reminder of the Beauty and Power of Black Hair

Earlier this year, Pierre Jean-Louis, an artist based on the East Coast, posted a photo of a Black woman’s hair that he reimagined as a piece of art that looked like a perfectly coiled galaxy. Since then, Jean-Louise has continued to post artistic renditions of Black women’s hair on Instagram, and every photo is as beautiful as the last.  

Screenshot fron En Pointe Studio's Instagram

This Dance Studio is Breaking the Color Lines and Empowering Dancers of Color

Seven weeks ago, En Pointe Studio, which is located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, made their first post on Instagram, and ever since then, they have dedicated every post to celebrating young Black dance talent. A week ago, they released a photo of all their talented dancers.  En Pointe Studio is shattering the imposed color lines in the dance world, and it is truly inspiring.

tracee-ellis-ross

Black Girls Rock! Pushes Back Against Erasure Of Black Women On TV

It’s only March, but so far it’s been a good year for continuing the conversation of the representation of Black women in the media. For a quick recap, Mya Taylor was the first transgender woman to win a major award. Then, a misinformed and unwoke writer tried to come for #Blackgirlmagic, but no one was having it. We’re not even half way through the year and the celebration of Black women is in full swing, and in one week, the Black Girls Rock! Annual Awards Show returns with Tracee Ellis Ross as host.

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A Visible Love, A Visible Movement: An Interview With Veronica Morris-Moore

During the week of February 21st, Veronica Morris-Moore did not rest. She was dedicating her body, her energy, and her time to making sure that people make the smart choices for the betterment of Black lives.

Instead of sleeping, Morris-Moore protested against Anita Alvarez, the current state attorney for Chicago who in no way, shape, or form should have control over Black lives because she abuses her power and has no respect for Black people. Morris-Moore rightfully believes that the greatest power that we have seen is action and protest. Her language is poetic and her dedication is inspiring. With Morris-Moore and the efforts of Fearless Leading by the Youth (F.L.Y.), an organization founded to enact change by carrying out political campaigns created by Black youth. Because of their work, there will now be a trauma center on the Southside of Chicago.  In this installment of Black Youth Spotlight, we talk with Morris-Moore and gain insight into  how her actions has helped save lives on the Southside.

Instagram photo by Pax Jones

#UnfairandLovely is A Stand Against Colorism

In most cultures that have been affected by white supremacy, there are white standards of beauty in place to tell women that they are not beautiful enough to be loved or wanted in their society. Unfortunately, when beauty is based solely on European standards, a woman’s physical and mental potential is not related to a her intelligence. Instead, this logic suggests that the whiter she is, then the prettier and more successful she will be.  However with hashtag #UnfairandLovely, South Asian women are taking a stand against this system of oppression called colorism. This hashtag is important because it raises much needed awareness of the discrimination that women face because of their darker complexions.

Blake Simons

Millennials in the Movement: BYP Spotlight with Blake Simons

You just don’t wake up one morning and start enacting social change. There is a moment when you become racially conscious and from that day on, you cannot shake this political awareness–it sticks with you. Everyone’s path to wokeness is different. No matter the different paths that are taken, young Black people are doing good work, changing what it means to be a Black activist today.  

In this edition of our Black Youth Spotlight series, we highlight Blake Simons. He is the Deputy Communications director for the Afrikan Black Coalition,  a Black organization in the UC colleges that strives to promote Black culture, awareness, and leadership.  Blake believes that the celebration of Black History should not be limited to a single month—it should happen everyday.  Right now through the Afrikan Black Coalition, he is spreading his political awareness of what it means to be Black during a time where innocent lives are lost and threatened due to senseless acts of violence.