PHD

8 Black Women Graduate with PhD from Indiana University in May

This May, eight Black women will be walking the stage to receive their PhDs in Education from Indiana University. These women did not all start the program together, however they found each other during their academic journey and created these strong relationships that helped them achieve their goals, and this May they are making history.

Photo Credit: David Wilson (2007)

Did We Do Enough To Save Chicago State University? Not At All.

Less than 24 hours after Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders hosted a rally at Chicago State University, all 900 employees of the university received layoff notices. The layoffs appear to be the final blow in the nearly 8 month battle between Chicago State (as well as other predominantly-Black public colleges) and Illinois politicians. But while many have directed their anger over the budget impasse at Springfield, primarily towards Republican governor Bruce Rauner, one thing is certain: Chicago itself did not do enough to save CSU.

Black students in geles by Jamaica Gilmer

It’s More Than A Head Wrap For US

At the beginning of Black History Month, a group of Black girls at the School for Creative Studies in Durham, North Carolina wanted to wear “geles”, also known as head wraps, in order to celebrate their African heritage. How did the school administration respond to this celebration of Black culture? Negatively and without any consideration for what the head wraps could have meant for the young women.

Blake Simons

Millennials in the Movement: BYP Spotlight with Blake Simons

You just don’t wake up one morning and start enacting social change. There is a moment when you become racially conscious and from that day on, you cannot shake this political awareness–it sticks with you. Everyone’s path to wokeness is different. No matter the different paths that are taken, young Black people are doing good work, changing what it means to be a Black activist today.  

In this edition of our Black Youth Spotlight series, we highlight Blake Simons. He is the Deputy Communications director for the Afrikan Black Coalition,  a Black organization in the UC colleges that strives to promote Black culture, awareness, and leadership.  Blake believes that the celebration of Black History should not be limited to a single month—it should happen everyday.  Right now through the Afrikan Black Coalition, he is spreading his political awareness of what it means to be Black during a time where innocent lives are lost and threatened due to senseless acts of violence.

black-girl-student

The First-Generation: Another Perspective Of The Low Black STEM Population

Everyone keeps asking why there aren’t more Black STEM students and professionals. But few are discussing the difficulties faced by first-generation Black students.

I am not shy about my experiences as an engineering student at the University of Southern California and STEM professional in Orange County, California. To put it lightly, it wasn’t fun. Actually, it was horrible. That’s why all of these articles asking why there aren’t more Black coders or more Black scientists or more Black students in STEM majors irritate me to no end. The focus on Black and STEM students and professionals and their invisibility is a much more nuanced conversation than many of these articles let on.

New York Daily News

NYC teacher files suit for being fired for teaching about the Central Park Five

One Manhattan high school has made clear not all lessons are worth learning, particularly those that highlight the fallacies of the criminal justice system.

According to New York Daily News, Jeena Lee-Walker filed suit against the Department of Education and school administrators on Friday for being fired for teaching her students about the Central Park Five as an English teacher at the High School for Arts, Imagination and Inquiry.

Elite Degrees Give Black Americans Little Advantage In Job Market

harvard

A new study from the University of Michigan shows that elite credentials give black Americans very little advantage in the job market.

From the University of Michigan:

Gaddis used a unique field experiment to test the value of different types of college degrees in the labor market for white and black candidates. He created more than 1,000 fake job applicants through email addresses, phone numbers and résumés, and applied to jobs online. Each candidate listed a degree from either an elite school (Harvard, Stanford, Duke) or a nationally ranked, but less-selective state university (University of Massachusetts-Amherst, University of California-Riverside, University of North Carolina-Greensboro).

Additionally, the candidates had first names that likely identified their race: Jalen, Lamar and DaQuan (black/male); Nia, Ebony, and Shanice (black/female); Caleb, Charlie and Ronny (white/male); and Aubrey, Erica and Lesly (white/female).

White job applicants with a degree from an elite university had the highest response rate (nearly 18 percent), followed by black candidates with a degree from an elite university (13 percent) and white candidates with a degree from a less-selective university (more than 11 percent). Black job applicants with a degree from a less-selective university had the lowest response rate (less than 7 percent).

Read the entire study here.

 

Photo: Harvard