A sign inside the Quilombo reads "Students in struggle!" (Photo by Kristian Davis Bailey)

The Case of Quilombo: Black Students Fight to Stay in Brazilian Universities

By Kristian Davis Bailey

In December 2016, I visited the Fluminense Federal University (UFF) in Rio de Janeiro. Students had been occupying UFF for 45 days, with some sleeping inside barricaded academic buildings 24/7 to shut the university down.

The UFF Occupation was one of 1,000 national occupations protesting Michel Temer’s right-wing presidential coup and his constitutional amendment to freeze funding for public services for 20 years, including education and healthcare.

Within the UFF Occupation was Quilombo, a Black occupation of students and community members fighting for a Black Studies program, a Black community center, and against racism on campus.

education

What you need to know about Trump’s proposed $9 billion budget slashes to public education

This week, the Trump Administration released its budget, which includes $9 billion cuts to the Department of Education. The budget seeks to eliminate subsidized student loans, public service loan forgiveness, and many other programs that help millions of students afford higher education and succeed in school. These proposed changed are extremely harmful to public education as we know it today.

How a Chicago mayor’s proposal to make post-grad plans a requirement for graduating harms Black & Brown students

Not content with over-policing Black folks in the streets and at their schools, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is now extending these practices into their academics. Earlier this week, the mayor shared his bright idea for requiring Chicago Public Schools students to produce a letter of acceptance from a 2 or 4-year university, vocational school, a branch of the military, or a job before receiving their diploma–starting with this year’s freshman class.

Your Digital Toolbox for Justice and Resistance

The look and feel of movements for justice and equity are changing thanks to social media’s ability to spread messages and create access to information, resources, and actions. Pushing these limits of social media use are young people of color and their networks (the ignition of #BlackLivesMatter is an example), as this group finds different ways to spread messages focusing on the things they care about. In this way, communication and movement building tie together by tightly spreading information that can’t as easily be hidden, whitewashed, or ignored. Thus, these young people are creating a digital toolbox for justice.

“Don’t Be A Bystander”: An Interview With Aaryn Lang On Responding to Racist Attacks [VIDEO]

The current political moment requires that young, socially-savvy people lead on issues of gendered oppression, racism, education inequality, and many other issues facing marginalized groups.

In this way, communication and movement building tie together tightly spreading information that can’t as easily be hidden, white washed, or ignored and creating a digital tool box for justice. Project NIA and The Barnard Center for Research on Women have added a resource to this toolbox, aimed at helping you respond to situations of violence on individual and systemic levels.

A conversation on allyship with one of the masterminds behind the Safety Pin Box

There are a number of things in this world we cannot measure with metrics, time, or money making it difficult to account for their effectiveness or worth – allyship has always been one of those things. When it comes to allies, there are more questions around their purpose and usefulness than there are answers. Enter the Safety Pin Box, countering everything allies thought their role actually was.

This new video compares Donald Trump’s platform to the Black Panther Party’s

Unfortunately, we should now accept that Donald Trump will be President of the United States come January 20, 2017 (over a month later I’m still experiencing some disbelief in this truth). But what I won’t accept are his disingenuous attempts to be inclusive and to work for Black people.

A Few Ways to Support Police Abolition In The New Year (Or Right Now)

“Why do we accept forms of security that are rooted in violence?” – Angela Davis, Lecture at University of Chicago November 2016

When I first learned of prison abolition it was from Angela Davis during a lecture she gave at my college campus in 2009. The concept of prison abolition seemed so large and out of reach and it wasn’t something I put much thought into until this year, but a defeatist attitude isn’t what abolished slavery – so who am I to doubt the possibilities of abolition?

Being Black at School Is The Type Of Activism We Need Right Now

In recent years, the many highly publicized acts of violence against Black people of all ages have drawn attention to the disparate conditions facing this group on all fronts. Yet, a particularly treacherous place for Black people is in school. Luckily, one activist is doing her part to change that reality for Black students across the country.

 

I recently had the chance to connect with Kelly Wickham Hurst to learn about her new organization dedicated to making schools more equitable, safer, and fair for Black students, Being Black at School. Hurst, the Founder and Executive Director of BBAS, spent “23 years in the public education system as a teacher, literacy coach, guidance dean, and assistant principal” before leaving to start BBAS.

Facing Race: Building for Racial Justice In Schools Post-Election

By Nuala Cabral

Last Thursday, over two thousand people from across the country came together in Atlanta for Facing Race, a national conference on racial justice. Organized by the NY-based nonprofit Race Forward, the conference embodies the organization’s mission to “build awareness, solutions, and leadership for racial justice.” The timing of this conference couldn’t have been more perfect; only one day earlier Donald Trump was announced president elect of the United States. The conference, thus, became a space where folks could grieve and process the implications of this destructive election and strategize around ways we can respond.