Rhythm, Blue, Social Disorder

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3cFVlKO8gA&feature=fvst

The conscious humyn evaluates and integrates various influences of  style regardless of race, gender or and social divisions. If “male” has a significance, you could receive the conscious male and his personality as influenced by Sade or Nina Simone. He, or better the humyn, could express a masculinity/femininity that is too distinct for either/or. Manifesting the Sade in him, he’s not afraid to express his experience of the sweetest taboo. Nothing’s loss of his power to create in the world, though he may tell you that he wants to feel an intense love like no other.

Bodies Diced Up On Drum Machines: Knowledge From New Choreographers

Our parents figured that their generation saw the end of “real” dancing. You know, they tell you that they danced artistically and romantically and that we have pioneered a tasteless substitute for sex. I’m embarrassed to say that I was starting to believe the hype, but this was before I paid attention to our generation of choreographers. Never has there been such a style that is so sensitive to both music and lyrics as that of our young people of color. Artists such as Ian Eastwood, Kenzo Alvares and Pat Cruz represent a new heritage of dance that brings the body, as an object of creative contortion, to the incomplete music of Hip Hop and R&B.    

While SNAPBACKS Take Over…

 

If I must have something that I don’t like about having locks, it would be that I can’t rock a snapback. Had there not been so much of a conversion in the herds of Black youth—fitted caps are nearly extinct among the heads of the coolest kids—my lament over snap backs would not even be an issue. No one can argue that the switch is another life-imitating-art fanatic, since none of the mainstream rappers—Drake, Maybach Music, J. Cole, etc.—wear snap backs. Besides, those types of perspectives, that restrict trends to imitations of media, demonstrate lazy thinking; instead, I think that the appeal to snapbacks connects to its forum for creativity.

The Reason T-Pain Can Be Sexy; A Critique of Popular Aesthetics Part I

Celebrity, the representation and popularizing of a face, determine our aesthetics—models that our minds, in one sense, refer to when judging a person’s beauty. We can say that the drastic changes in whom and what we find attractive are inspired by the popular surveillance of a specific body.  Upon seeing a face manifest through a television source, a face that overcomes exclusive requirements to be there, a viewer can sufficiently convert their jealousy into praise. Without a doubt, we viewers further a history of valorizing particular persons for their “transcendence” of being average, and in effect view the box-glaring body with lust. I would have no problem with this fanaticism if the value of the person were substantial, yet the appeal of celebrities often comes from the pity we feel for ourselves; for not making it past the bouncer of popular media.

Why You Should Be Taking Tyler, the Creator and Kreayshawn Seriously

Last Saturday night, Kreayshawn and the White Girl Mob played a sold-out gig in Hollywood. And according to Spin Magazine, it was an insane show.

“…the audience rushed the stage where they proceeded to completely freak out — bouncing, stripping, cooking, and flipping into the crowd — until the music was done and they were forced bodily from the limelight by the venue’s security. It was intensely electric.”

The next day, she hit the VMAs, where she was nominated (and a favorite) for the Best New Artist Award. She lost to like-minded and equally controversial Tyler, the Creator. Like Kreayshawn, Tyler and Odd Future rose to prominence through YouTube, blogs and social media, don’t fit in any radio format, and have sharply divided critics and fans.

A lot of people aren’t taking Kreayshawn and Odd Future seriously. And that’s understandable. When something comes along that is so alien to mainstream standards and tastes, it always gets dismissed.

But don’t be fooled. Their success is organic and real; not some record label’s scheme. The rise of artists like Odd Future and Kreayshawn (as well as Lil B and Waka Flocka Flame) is subversive to Hip Hop’s status quo. And it might end up being a big deal.

About the Dorks on Facebook

[Like] posts have taken over facebook. You see them religiously on young Black teens’ walls, and (less acceptable) they appear on 18 and 19 year-old pages. I see no other reason for such creations except various situations of low self-esteem. No one can blame young folks; as teenage years mark the beginning of partner relationships, meaning the desires to be with others raises our consciousness of ourselves on the outside. Innocent beginnings like these deserve caution though.

The Truth About Quickies As By J. Cole

Relationships, these days, get more undesirable as the option to leave everything after a kiss becomes more of a trend. Love’s new hot-minute flavored makeover has its moment of truth, this week, due to a new track by J. Cole.   “Workout”, Cole’s first single of his debut album, puts all the hours we kill running “game” into perspective: all the thought we put into crafting swank outfits and all the ambition we focus into pick-up lines only get us one night of bliss.  And ladies, J doesn’t forget about y’all in the track; better yet, he understands that not all womyn want to “love…forever” every person they have a good time with. I thought it was just college culture, but having quick affairs is the trait of a Black youth world view on love.

Distant Relatives: Tomorrow Kings and OFWGKTA

The word around Chicago whispers about those young cats in LA, Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All, and it supposes that OFWGKTA probably bumped some Chicago tracks on their iPods.  Crowd hoppers of the last decade, from Wicker Park to Lakeview, can immediately see the similarities between OFWGKTA and the “Windy City’s” own Tomorrow Kings. Unfortunately, I don’t have the proper info to confirm influence by older Tomorrow Kings on Odd Future, but I do have enough to attribute Chi-pride to this collective of emcees that pioneered a new culture of Hip Hop. After the “video hoe” and “ice” age of Hip Hop, emcees started emerging out of a love for literature; even Jay Electronica drops lyrics like, “Spit that Kurt Vonnegut/That blow yo brain/Kurt Cobain, that Nirvana sh#t.” Sure, cats have been experimenting with rhyme scheme and making allusions to high school classics since the days of Tupac, however the 90’s did not facilitate the complete revolution that we have seen with Tomorrow Kings and OFWGKTA.