crwn-cover-ig

CRWN Is The Black Women’s Magazine We Have All Been Waiting For

Originally from Sacramento, CA Lindsey Day, the co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of the new Black women’s hair magazine CRWN, said she got her tough attitude from her dad’s relatives on the east coast. Not only that, she has always had the drive to change the world around her and the tenacity to see it through.

“I always wanted to help people,” Day said, “that was something that was like a common thread I really wanted to do something in my work that would help others.”

Pretoria-High-School-protest-2

May We Always Cherish the Freedom Fighters of Pretoria High School for Girls

When I first read the code of conduct administered at Pretoria High School for Girls in South Africa, I was mortified. As a mother, with a daughter whose hair at 3 years old would be classified by some as “nappy”, all I could think was “How would I do her hair if this came home from her school?” The answer quickly revealed itself: I wouldn’t. I couldn’t.

JSS header banner

#JustSaySorry Campaign Lights up Social Media for Sexual Assault Survivors

In recent years, movements to address sexual assault on college campuses have gained attention and achievements across the United States. Activists Wagatwe Wanjuki and Kamilah Willingham are adding their voices to the conversation with their #JustSaySorry campaign, highlighting the importance of colleges acknowledging their failures in addressing sexual violence on campus. In an interview, Wanjuki shared the goals and guiding principles of the campaign.

simone-biles-twitter-olympics-medals

The 2016 Olympics Were A Showcase For Young Black Women’s Excellence

Simone Biles. Simone Manuel. Michelle Carter. Claressa Shields. Allyson Felix. Ibtihaj Muhammad. These are just some of the names of Black women who excelled on the world’s biggest stage in the 2016 Rio Olympics.

It feels as if this round of games came as fast as they went. And while there were plenty of wonderful and inspiring moments to last us until we do it all over again in a few years, the brightest ones often came from the accomplishments of talented Black women who repeatedly stole the show.

simone-biles-twitter-olympics

Black Girl Magic and the 2016 Olympics: The Water and Oil of Black Athleticism

This article was originally posted at Water Cooler Convos.

Over the past two weeks, I have watched Black girl after Black girl medal in the 2016 Summer Olympics. Simone Biles has dominated gymnastics. Simone Manuel did the same in swimming. Michelle Carter won gold in shot put. And, while I felt immense pride watching each of them claim victory in their respective sports, I can’t lie and say that I wasn’t conflicted about it all.

5997920696_ecb224068e_z

Women Jailed at a Faster Rate than Men, Two-Thirds are Women of Color

According to the New York Times, a new study from the Vera Institute of Justice shows that the number of women in jails in the United States is increasing more quickly than the number of men in jails. The majority of these women are black or Hispanic and many are also low-income. The study suggests the increasing rate of female inmates has been overlooked by criminal justice reform efforts.

IMG_5347

BlacQurl Fosters Space for Black Women Creatives & Critics

For black women interested in art, the opportunity to speak with like-minded peers can be few and far between. The lack of space for black women in the art world compelled Jovonna Jones and Samantha Scott to create BlacQurl, an online magazine and platform for black women and femme writers, creatives, and critics.

korryn-joyce-skye

5 Ways To Stop Harming Black Women Today

One of my favorite gospel songs growing up said, “Give me my flowers, while I yet live, so that I can see the beauty that they bring.” The song always stuck with me now it resonates even more.

This past Friday, Joyce Quaweay was brutally beaten by her boyfriend and his friend reportedly because she would not submit. On Saturday, Skye Mockabee (26) was found dead in a Cleveland parking lot.  And, on Monday, Korryn Gaines (23) was killed while holding her 5-year-old son in her arms. As Brittney Cooper so aptly notes at the Crunk Feminist Collective, all of these women’s deaths are connected. To see them any other way is to deny the culture of white hetero-patriarchy in this country.

As a queer Black woman in the United States, I am keenly aware that my mere existence in public spaces is seen as disruptive, agitating, confrontational, and deserving of violence. For many trans and cis Black women, these sentiments extend into their private spaces as well. So how do we work to protect one another in moments like these? What do we do next?

Here are a few things we can work on right now that can help move toward collective liberation.

Taylor and Melania

We Must Offer Black Women The Same Protections We Offer White Women

By now, the world has heard at length about the gaffes of two very famous white women this week. Taylor Swift was exposed on Snapchat by Kim Kardashian and Kanye West for lying about approving Kanye’s lyrics in his song “Famous.” Melania Trump, the wife of the Republican nominee for president, apparently lifted part of her Republican National Convention Speech from Michelle Obama’s 2008 Democratic National Convention speech. These two instances are part of a larger history of white women and public victimhood in the United States.