EricaGarner

Why We Should Celebrate #LoudBlackGirls

Last week, at the end of President Obama’s ABC town hall on policing, Erica Garner spoke up for herself.

“I was railroaded!” she exclaimed, complaining that she did not receive apt time to ask the President a question, which she had been promised by ABC. Ultimately, according to reports, President Obama noticed Garner and did have a conversation with her after the town hall. This incident sparked the trend #LoudBlackGirls on Twitter, with black women discussing the times they, and other important black women, spoke up for themselves or for others.

Black Lives Matter

On Being Biracial In The Movement For Black Lives

Sometimes I feel like people see me like they see Rachel Dolezal. Yeah, her.

As a biracial woman (half Black, half white) from the suburbs, whose features are not predominately “Black”, I find myself in a constant battle with myself as I try to figure out if fighting for equity and the uplift of the Black community is something I should act on – or even speak on – knowing that by doing so I am taking up space that should be reserved for darker-skinned Black people who cannot necessarily pass for anything else.

Kwyn Townsend Riley

Poet Beautifully Details Black Women’s Struggles At PWI’s

While there are sure to be challenges at any kind of institution, the challenges that people of color face at predominantly white institutions (PWI) are a separate story. To take that idea even further, the experiences that black women have at PWIs can be even more stressful.

To detail those exact experiences, Kwyn Townsend Riley performed a poem detailing the 10 “guaranteed experiences” for black women at PWIs, including having people play in their hair, explaining the importance of #SayHerName and constantly having to educate.

Political Cartoon from Garrison's Twitter Account.

On The Blatant Racism of Garrison’s Political Cartoon of Michelle Obama

On May 13, Ben Garrison released a racist photo that compared the First Lady Michelle Obama to Melania Trump. While Melania was depicted as the epitome of femininity, the First Lady was depicted as a muscular brute, a thing to be feared and unwanted. As President Obama’s second term in the White House comes to an end, we are left to reflect on mainstream media’s treatment of FLOTUS and what that means for young Black girls in America.

Picture from Pierre Jean-Louis' Instagram.

Jean-Louis’ Images are a Reminder of the Beauty and Power of Black Hair

Earlier this year, Pierre Jean-Louis, an artist based on the East Coast, posted a photo of a Black woman’s hair that he reimagined as a piece of art that looked like a perfectly coiled galaxy. Since then, Jean-Louise has continued to post artistic renditions of Black women’s hair on Instagram, and every photo is as beautiful as the last.  

Black Woman Afro

In New Johns Hopkins Study, Black Women’s Hair Can’t Win For Losing

Last week, a research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine published a review of 19 studies titled “All Hairstyles Are Not Created Equal”, in which they analyzed the relationship between “scalp-pulling” hairstyles and hair loss among Black women. The takeaway, according to Dr. Crystal Aguh, is to offer both Black women patients and dermatologists tips for how to better prevent traction alopecia by avoiding high and moderate risk styles, like weaves, locs, tight ponytails, chemical treatments and braids.

Mindy-Project

Why I Wish “The Mindy Project” Was Cancelled

In 2012, when I found out that the Mindy Kaling landed a show, I was ecstatic. At the time, I was still in the Scandal and Nicole Beharie in Sleepy Hollow bliss. When I first started watching Kaling’s show, The Mindy Project, I was willing to ignore some of the jokes that didn’t land or the undeveloped characters because it’s still a struggle for people of color to be represented on television. Now almost four years later, my enthusiasm and dedication for The Mindy Project has disintegrated. I am left wishing that the show was canceled because it doesn’t even try to confront race.