Dance Group Stages Flashmob to Protest ‘Stand Your Ground’ Laws

A dance group called Dance for Action staged a flashmob outside of Chuck Schumer’s New York office in protest of “Stand Your Ground” laws.

Inspired by the verdict in the George Zimmerman trial.

From NewsOne:

“We were really upset at the outcome and so were a lot of our friends,” said Sheila Anozier (pictured below left), a professional dancer who co-organized the flashmob — a group of people who assemble and perform for a short time and then immediately disperse — with friend Marie Philippeaux. (pictured below). “We wanted to do something in action towards the solution of getting rid of the ‘Stand Your Ground’ law.

San Diego Students Suspended, Banned from Graduation and Prom Over Twerk Video

A group of students at Scripps Ranch High School in San Diego have been suspended, banned from prom, and will not walk at graduation after participating in a twerk video that found its way onto the internet.

Thirty-two dancers participated in the video, allegedly unaware that it would be semi-professionally edited with music, and posted on YouTube. The filmmakers used school equipment and filmed the video outside of their media classroom.

Many of the affected students and their classmates are outraged by the harsh punishments, and hope to have their privileges reinstated at an upcoming hearing.

Stolen Property | THE HARLEM SHAKE

Blogger, Rashad J. Smith 

The Black Culture is pure and rich.
The creative minds of those before our time created opportunities where non existed, in every facet of art and education.
Fashion, music, cuisine, language, and rhythmic movements are amongst the many art forms created and perfected by Blacks.
 Most recently, The Harlem Shake has been added to the list of stolen property.

MSNBC’S Melissa Harris-Perry addresses the issue  in a 4 minute Jaunty video with historical context, authentic comparisons, and clarifying THE REAL HARLEM SHAKE:

Bodies Diced Up On Drum Machines: Knowledge From New Choreographers

Our parents figured that their generation saw the end of “real” dancing. You know, they tell you that they danced artistically and romantically and that we have pioneered a tasteless substitute for sex. I’m embarrassed to say that I was starting to believe the hype, but this was before I paid attention to our generation of choreographers. Never has there been such a style that is so sensitive to both music and lyrics as that of our young people of color. Artists such as Ian Eastwood, Kenzo Alvares and Pat Cruz represent a new heritage of dance that brings the body, as an object of creative contortion, to the incomplete music of Hip Hop and R&B.