President Obama awards Oprah Winfrey & Ernie Banks with Presidential Medal of Freedom


Baseball legend Ernie Banks and the Queen of Daytime Television’s Oprah Winfrey were bestowed with one of the highest honors yesterday when they received the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Banks was saluted by President Obama for being the first African American to play for the Chicago Cubs (which is a lot coming from Obama, as he is a loyal Chicago White Sox fan).

Oprah on Jay Z-Belafonte Beef: ‘There Are Multiple Ways to Protest’

Oprah recently weighed in on the recent dust-up between Jay Z and Harry Belafonte.

After Jay was criticized by Belafonte for not being more politically engaged, Jay Z responded with lyrics that many found very disrespectful:

I’m just trying to find common ground/’fore Mr. Belafonte come and chop a n*gga down/Mr. Day O, major fail/Respect these youngins boy, it’s my time now.

According to Oprah, a generational gap is at the heart of their disagreement, but both of them are protesting in their own way.

Oprah Winfrey: Trayvon Martin Parallels Emmett Till

Oprah Winfrey is currently getting rave reviews – and Oscar buzz – for her role in the upcoming Lee Daniels film “The Butler.”

During a recent interview, Winfrey discussed the new film and how it will impact audiences, considering the recent acquittal of George Zimmerman for the murder of Trayvon Martin.

From the Grio:

“It’s so easy during this time… Trayvon Martin paralleled Emmett Till, let me just tell ya. In my mind. Same thing.

Today in Post-Race History: The Essential Tyler Perry

Right so, according to my Facebook page and Twitter account, Tyler Perry and Oprah (aka Madea and Miss Sophia) tried to get all Watch the Throne on us and collabo on some crappy TV shows. Essentially, Tyler created a couple of shows for his BFF’s fledgling network, a bunch of people watched them and concluded that not only do they suck, but the The Haves and the Have Nots and Love Thy Neighbor are the televisual equivalent of the hair relaxer: Bad for black women. So bad, in fact, that there’s a petition about getting Tyler Perry off OWN, as if all that other stuff on the network is, like, awesome. But whatever.

Raising $80,000 for the Negro In History | CALL TO ACTION

Eunique Jones has created a photographic sensation with her “Because of Them, We Can-Black History and Beyond” campaign and has taken the movement to KICKSTARTER.

The plan is to raise $80,000 by June 19th, to produce a high quality book contained with all 365 images of kids turned icons.

The KICKSTARTER project will cover design and layout, copyediting, printing and delivering expenses for the book.


While the National conversation about the lack of Black history in education persists, Eunique has found her niche to continuously impact the world and creatively educate Black chidlren about the power of their people.

Youth as the Miner's Canaries of Democracies!

In Peter Coy’s article the Kids Are Not Alright, he quotes that democracies are “much better at managing large numbers of highly educated people” than are nations with an official leader who has absolute authority (read: autocratic countries).  Leaders of autocratic nations face the dilemma of needing an educated work force to grow their country’s economy, but with increased levels of education the possibility of political dissent grows. This point is most elaborated in the recent youth revolts in Egypt and Tunisia.  A large part of what drove Egyptian and Tunisian youth to take action were the high unemployment rates. Across the globe youth in democracies also face high (or even higher) unemployment rates, yet, they aren’t toppling their respective governments. In democratic nations like Spain and the United States,  where the youth in Spain and American minority youth’s  unemployment rates are the equivalent or significantly higher than those rates seen in Egypt and Tunisia, why are the youth not carrying out mass political demonstrations?

Such a Painful Black Girl Reunion: Oprah and Iyanla

As a middle school student, I remember reading Iyanla Vanzant’s One Day My Soul Just Opened Up and thinking who is this black woman to write such a book about spiritual recovery that did not mention Jesus Christ as the penultimate factor in spiritual rejuvenation. Yes, back then I was a burgeoning Christian fundamentalist who enjoyed reading big girl books that I was not suppose to read including Terri McMillan’s How Stellar Got Her Groove Back and T.D. Jakes’ Woman Thou Art Loosed. So, now to watch Iyanla on Oprah tell her story of decline made me think about what it means for Black women to tell each other the “cold” truth in a world that in some very real ways are bent on our mental, spiritual, and physical demise or at the bare minimal our collective demoralization.