JAN 13 1968, JAN 14 1969; Black Panther Leader Discusses Cole Junior High School Ban On Seven Persons Attempting To Attend Teachers Meeting; From left are Mrs. Jean Moss; Frank Bailey, chairman of Denver Congress on Racial Equality (CORE); Lauren Watson, Denver Black Panther party leader; and Joe Boyd, staff member of the University of Colorado New Careers. Boyd and six others were denied admission to meeting.

The Black Panthers Are Finally Getting Air Time

The Black Panther Party, a revolutionary Black Nationalist and socialist party with a large and radical agenda based around activism of all sorts, is getting a documentary.

PBS will air The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution tomorrow, February 16, at 9PM/8 CST. The documentary explores the Black Panther Party by focusing on “its significance to the broader American culture, its cultural and political awakening for black people, and the painful lessons wrought a movement derails.”

New Film Revisits the 1983 US Invasion of Grenada

The 1983 United States invasion of the small Caribbean island of Grenada won’t be forgotten if filmmaker Damani Baker has anything to do with it. Baker was nine years-old when his mother moved him and his sister to Grenada during the nation’s revolution. His film, The House on Coco Road, is the story of family, history and revolution.

From KickStarter:

In 1979 the Grenadian people carry out the first successful revolution in the English speaking Caribbean. Maurice Bishop becomes Prime Minister. The Revolution attracts workers from around the world including my mother, Fannie Haughton. In 1982 Angela Davis, her family, and my mother visit Grenada to witness this miraculous Peoples’ Revolution. In 1983 my mother is offered a position in the Ministry of Education and we leave our home in Oakland and move to Grenada. I’d never seen her happier.

Grenada was briefly our home. In 1983 the United States led a military invasion following the assassination of the young popular Prime Minister, Maurice Bishop. We hid under the bed for three days as bombs shook our new paradise, and changed its course forever.

Sixteen years later, in 1999, I returned to Grenada with my mother, and began shooting a documentary film, searching for her story, one that felt not just untold, but unfinished. My mother, and a group of tireless women, had put their lives on the line, daring to build a better type of country, a stronger more resilient home. You may not know their names, but they have changed the world.

You can learn more about the film and support it here.

 

Photo: Courtesy of Damani Baker

 

Rhythm, Blue, Social Disorder

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3cFVlKO8gA&feature=fvst

The conscious humyn evaluates and integrates various influences of  style regardless of race, gender or and social divisions. If “male” has a significance, you could receive the conscious male and his personality as influenced by Sade or Nina Simone. He, or better the humyn, could express a masculinity/femininity that is too distinct for either/or. Manifesting the Sade in him, he’s not afraid to express his experience of the sweetest taboo. Nothing’s loss of his power to create in the world, though he may tell you that he wants to feel an intense love like no other.

The Digital Age and Social Change

Humyns are the type of beings that always must be in the mood. Anything that can manipulate our emotions provides us with resources to do what must be done. Even our leisure time comes from our activities; perhaps smoking outside on a nice afternoon is our picture of a good mood. These days, our lives are capable of controlling our emotions all day long. What’s changed the happiness of humyns is the availability of technology.

Black History Spotlight: ASSATA SHAKUR

Assata Shakur is a true revolutionary.

She fought for justice as a member of the Black Panther Party and the Black Liberation Movement, before being falsely accused of murder and sentenced to life in prison.

Refusing to be just another victim of COINTELPRO, Assata escaped from prison on November 2nd, 1979 and eventually found her way to Cuba, where she currently resides.

Today there is a one million dollar bounty on Shakur’s head; the FBI classifies her as a domestic terrorist.

Of course, we know the truth.

Hip Hop Is ‘Mixtape of the Revolution’ in Africa and the Middle East

Sujatha Fernandes has written a fascinating op-ed for the New York Times on Hip Hop’s influence on the waves of revolutions and protests across the Middle East and Africa.

According to Fernandes, Rappers have become highly influential spokespeople for a generation of youth disillusioned with an establishment deaf and blind to their concerns. Emcees are resonating with young people by concerning themselves with the experiences of those on the street, and give a voice to the voiceless.

What we are witnessing is the continued power of Hip Hop music and culture. It may have been co-opted by the establishment in America; but in Africa and the Middle East Hip Hop is setting off one revolution after another.