If Black innocence never exists to the state, how can passivism and perfect victimhood save us?

[Banner photo: A headline from The Daily Kos seeming to play up the fact that Jordan Edwards was unarmed and an “honor roll student”]

By Zoé Samudzi

On May 20, Richard Collins III, a young Black soon-to-be graduate of Bowie State University, was murdered by Sean Urbanski, a member of a white supremacist Facebook group called Alt-Reich Nation, whilst waiting for an Uber. The murder will be investigated as a hate crime. In the wake of recent emboldenings of white nationalists across the country, Black Americans are increasingly caught between a state and non-state white supremacist hard place. What does it mean when our sense of freedom and liberation is tied up, in the words of Shannon Houston, in having been trained to negotiate with terrorists?

Ashanti Hunter

Why seeing the murder of Ashanti Hunter as anti-Black violence does not distract us from fighting for Black men and boys

By Treva Lindsey

Often, there is an alarming silence around the deaths of Black women. From the under-reported murders of Black women by their former or current partners to the vicious and specific targeting of Black trans* women, the killings of Black women rarely garner sustained media coverage, substantive rallying cries, or formidable mobilization and organizing from people other than Black women and gender non-conforming/fluid people.

EXCLUSIVE: Alicia Garza on What’s Missing from the Black Lives Matter Movement

By Liz Adetiba and Jordie Davies

 

The Oakland-based organizer and activist Alicia Garza, who is also the originator of the Black Lives Matter rallying cry and one of the founders of the Black Lives Matter Network, thinks Black people have a lot to talk about outside of police violence. In this interview, we discussed with Garza what she believed is missing from the movement, how it is portrayed in the media, and the various points of entry for activism–from politics to protest.

Richard Sherman Changes Tune, Is Fed Up With ‘The State Of Things’ Facing Blacks

Richard Sherman rose in prominence a few years ago when his emotional response after a game garnered a slew of racist responses. At that time, he told the world that using the word “thug” in reference to Black people was just another way of calling them the “n-word.” Since then, he participating in what looked like an “all lives matter” demonstration with his Seahawks teammates and coaches. But, now, he seems to have moved back to his original position.

Charlene Carruthers: “Body cameras don’t help us sleep at night.”

There have been varying levels of concern about the criminalization of Black women and children since 23-year-old Korryn Gaines was killed by Baltimore Police in her own apartment while holding her 5-year-old son. Similarly, conversation about excessive police violence has erupted following the video release of Paul O’Neal’s murder at the hands of Chicago Police.

5 Ways To Stop Harming Black Women Today

One of my favorite gospel songs growing up said, “Give me my flowers, while I yet live, so that I can see the beauty that they bring.” The song always stuck with me now it resonates even more.

This past Friday, Joyce Quaweay was brutally beaten by her boyfriend and his friend reportedly because she would not submit. On Saturday, Skye Mockabee (26) was found dead in a Cleveland parking lot.  And, on Monday, Korryn Gaines (23) was killed while holding her 5-year-old son in her arms. As Brittney Cooper so aptly notes at the Crunk Feminist Collective, all of these women’s deaths are connected. To see them any other way is to deny the culture of white hetero-patriarchy in this country.

As a queer Black woman in the United States, I am keenly aware that my mere existence in public spaces is seen as disruptive, agitating, confrontational, and deserving of violence. For many trans and cis Black women, these sentiments extend into their private spaces as well. So how do we work to protect one another in moments like these? What do we do next?

Here are a few things we can work on right now that can help move toward collective liberation.

Here’s what young people think about police violence and guns

The survey findings below are summarized in the report “Gun Violence, Policing, and Young Communities of Color – July 2016” which can be downloaded here.

The recent police killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile have raised important questions on the issues of gun violence, policing, and communities of color in the United States. Most importantly, the increased media attention to this issue shines a light on the ways that people of all genders, races, ages, and classes develop political opinions on these societal conditions.

Na Ponta dos Pés is a Ballet Studio and a Safe Haven for Brazilian Girls

Although she did not aspire to become a professional ballet dancer, Tuany Nascimento never stopped practicing ballet while in Brazil.  Whenever she practiced, groups of young girls always followed her, wanting to learn and emulate her skills as a dancer. Nascimento not only taught these young girls, in 2013 she opened the dance studio, Na Ponta dos Pés, and started teaching young girls ballet.