Fighting the Arrest of Tonya McDowell: Educating Your Child Should Not Be a Crime

Fighting the Arrest of Tonya McDowell: Educating Your Child Should Not Be a Crime
Dr. Boyce Watkins, Huffington Post | April 24, 2011

When I heard about the case of Tonya McDowell, the homeless mother sent to jail for sending her 5-year-old son to the “wrong” school district, I immediately thought back to the case of Kelley Williams-Bolar not long ago. I wondered how the world has gone mad enough to somehow think that it should be against the law for mothers to find ways to get their children access to a high quality education.

As a result of this homeless single mother having the audacity to get her child into a good school, she is being charged with first-degree theft and also being asked to repay the $15,686 it allegedly cost to educate her child in the Norwalk, Conn. school district. No one cares that this family has no home. No one seems to care about what will happen if this child grows up without the only woman on earth wired to love him unconditionally. No one seems to care about the massive costs to the state of prosecuting this mother and eventually the child, as we deliberately trap them in an intergenerational cycle of poverty and criminal justice. All that seems to matter is that they keep this little boy out of their school.  (Read more)

April 18, 2011 – April 24, 2011

Some schools still struggle despite efforts
Tina Marie Macias, The Advertiser, April 23, 2011

Jobless rate for young workers in US highest since 1948
James Brewer, WS News, April 22, 2011

Racist graffiti found at Birmingham Seaholm High School
Tammy Stables, Detroit Free Press, April 22, 2011

NU students help close the achievement gap at ETHS through tutoring program
Susan Du, Daily Northwestern, April 21, 2011

Student to retrace “freedom ride”
Weston Pletcher, The Kansan, April 21, 2011

More Black men in prison now than enslaved in 1850
Dick Price, Toledo Journal, April 21, 2011

LAPD Changes Procedure that ‘Singled Out’ Black and Latino Students
Leiloni De Gruy, LA Wave, April 20, 2011

The voice of America’s frustrated youth, Power Shift, is on its way to the UK
Guppi Bola, The Guardian, April 20, 2011

Youth Activism Rises in D.C.
Erica Butler, Afro News, April 20, 2011

UNC-system historically black colleges and universities affected by budget cuts
Vinayak Balasubramanian, The Daily Tar Heel, April 20, 2011

Three Hip-Hop Scholars Talk About Combatting Homophobia
Akiba Solomon, Colorlines, April 19, 2011

BAYarts youth show attracts more than 100 young artists
Julie Cikra, The Observer, April 19, 2011

Hip-Hop Positivity
Garieka Godfrey, Courgar Link, April 19, 2011

The Power of Youth, Idealism and Nonviolence
Staff Writer, WITF, April 18, 2011

Giant Pictures Of African-American Males Make Law Student Feel Unwelcome
Elie Mystal, Above the Law News, April 18, 2011

Students protest lack of diversity among faculty
Mathew Davoli, BG Views News, April 18, 2011

Too many minorities in special ed, state says
Theresa Harrington
, Contra Costa Times, April 18, 2011

GPA requirement OK for minorities
Yetunde Ogunsakin, Red and Black News, April 18, 2011

Overfunding prisons while neglecting education
Ashahed M. Muhammad, The Final Call, April 18, 2011

 

Why Denzel Washington will NEVER be in a Tyler Perry Movie

Yes, I agree with Spike Lee 100% on this issue. Tyler Perry sells coonery and buffoonery and get’s paid. His excuse is because he makes so much money and employs black actors, this justifies his simplistic and stereotypical brand of comedy. But real talk, big time crack and heroin dealers make a lot of money too, and keep money in the pockets of black folks that work them corners, but it doesn’t excuse their negative impact on our community. Big evil corporations like Wal Mart make a lot of money and employ a lot of people, but they flood the market with cheap goods squeezing out smaller companies that make quality products that are actually worth purchasing.

Spike Lee will go down in history as one of the most important film directors of our time. Not only for his certified classics like “Malcolm X” and “Bamboozled“, but also because he was never afraid to take on issues that made us uncomfortable like Willie Lynch (School Daze), racism (Do the Right Thing) and interracial relationships (Jungle Fever). That doesn’t even include his two documentaries on Hurricane Katrina, “When The Levees Broke” and “If God Is Willing and Da Creek Don’t Rise“, and one of my personal favorite movies, “Inside Man“.

Body of Missing Student Found

Today Show | April 25, 2011

Maryland Police continue to search for clues about the disappearance and murder of high school student, Phylicia Barnes.  Her body was found in the icy waters of the Susquehanna River last week.

Beyonce, No

Usually I leave the music news to Dallas, who does a really good job of keeping me abreast of what the young folk are listening to.  Last week’s post on Kobe’s faux pax and the subject matter of this week’s entry are leading me to believe that I am fully committed to being unequivocally hated by my sister and my fellow homogays.

That’s right.  I listened to Beyonce’s recently leaked single, “Girls (Who Run the World).”  And you know what?  It’s craptastic.  And by “craptastic” I don’t mean it in that “Oh my god, what a vacuous, yet catchy new Beyonce song.  I think I’ll shake my ass” type way.  I mean “craptastic” in that “Neither the world’s most powerful wind machine nor all the glitter in the world could save this dissonant shit” type way.

Loosen the Ties that Once Were Nuses

There have been too many occasions in which a Black business has taken advantage of its customers for the sake of maximizing their income. A boatload majority of the support for these businesses comes from other Black people, and in effect, the profit-focused regulation creates a sad reality. Economic projects, whether entrepreneurship or achievement of employment, should always start for generating wealth on behalf of the people. I have a valid prescription since the statistics of poverty consists of mostly Blacks and Hispanics. First condition: Our thin pockets have suffered racist obstacles of entering the workforce (discrimination by names with more three syllables, etc.). Another condition: all the options for consuming are without integrity and largely without Black descent. Some bosses have formed their Black businesses correctly (with scholarships, , but they are not the point. We still have some stakeholders pocket their exploitation of Blacks without any remorse, never to contribute to the welfare of the people.

Juvenile Killers in Jail for Life Seek a Reprieve

Juvenile Killers in Jail for Life Seek a Reprieve
Adam Liptak and Lisa Faye Petak, New York Times | April 20, 2011

CHARLESTON, Mo. — More than a decade ago, a 14-year-old boy killed his stepbrother in a scuffle that escalated from goofing around with a blowgun to an angry threat with a bow and arrow to the fatal thrust of a hunting knife.

The boy, Quantel Lotts, had spent part of the morning playing with Pokémon cards. He was in seventh grade and not yet five feet tall.

Mr. Lotts is 25 now, and he is in the maximum-security prison here, serving a sentence of life without the possibility of parole for murder.

The victim’s mother, Tammy Lotts, said she lost two children on that November day in 1999. One was a son, Michael Barton, who was 17 when he died. The other was a stepson, Mr. Lotts.

“I don’t feel he’s guilty,” she said of Mr. Lotts in the living room of her modest St. Louis apartment, growing emotional. “But if he was, he’s already done his time. He should be released. Time served. If they think that’s too easy, let somebody look over his case.”

As things stand now, though, the law gives Mr. Lotts no hope of ever getting out.  (Read more)