Artist Makeda Lewis on Luck And Her Now Iconic Afro-Feminist Coloring Book

By: L. G. Parker

By now you’ve heard of Atlanta-based artist Makeda Lewis. The 25-year-old multidisciplinary artist’s Avie’s Dreams, an Afro-Feminist coloring book and surrealist poem, has been celebrated by Saint Heron, Nylon, Blavity and more. In its rich pages, uncolored images are accompanied by introspective words that speak to the artists journey as a person as well as Avie’s self-evolution, the book’s central character.

How our unhealthy understandings of accountability promote a race to the bottom

When Casey Affleck won the Oscar for his work in Manchester by the Sea last Sunday, many once again pointed out the racial double standard on sexual violence. If you recall, Nate Parker’s Oscar aspirations for his film The Birth of a Nation, initially regarded as a strong awards contender, were swiftly derailed when rape allegations against him from years ago resurfaced. Despite very similar past allegations, Affleck had no dim to his shine through his successful Oscar campaign. Similarly, the downfall of Bill Cosby, when contrasted with the continued success of Woody Allen, illuminates the ways in which anti-Blackness engenders a far more lenient response to sexual violence at the hands of white men compared to their Black counterparts.

The Scariest Part of ‘Get Out’ Was The Trueness To Life

SPOILERS AHEAD! Don’t @ me.

Over the weekend, Jordan Peele’s thriller Get Out scared audiences all over the nation with that age old American horror: anti-Black racism. The premise is simple enough: a white girl, Rose, brings home her Black boyfriend, Chris, to meet her parents in a wealthy, white suburb in upstate New York.

Producer Jahaan Sweet Speaks Black Art and the Joke that Helped Him Graduate from Juilliard

By: Imani J. Jackson

Asking people how they self-identify is more instructive than presumptively assigning them labels. So I asked Jahaan Sweet, during a recent hour-long, sit-down interview in an artsy enclave, who he is. “I consider myself a music maker.” He added that he is a burgeoning businessman, “I just like to create shit.” That spirit of Black creation, whether during the Depression Era Harlem Renaissance or Reagan Era rap movement, continues to thrive despite our oppressive conditions.

New England Patriots Player, Martellus Bennett, Won’t Visit White House With Team

It’s a standard tradition for championship teams to visit the sitting President of the United States at the White House and pose for a photo. They often award him with his very own jersey.

But the United States hasn’t ever had a president like Donald Trump and tradition’s likely to get thrown out of the window at any moment.