Kanye West isn’t “Traditionally American” Enough To Sit At Trump’s Table

Kanye West ruffled quite a lot of feathers when he announced his support of President-elect Trump while on stage. Then he made a stop to Trump Tower  to have a personal meeting with him and posed for pictures in the lobby.

Kanye had finally gotten the approval of those white billionaires he’s wanted for years at the expense of the respect of many of his fans and supporters. At least, that’s what it looked like.

Issa Rae and Jussie Smollett Are Teaming Up To Produce A New Web Series

It’ll probably be a while before the world’s thrown back into debates over relationships with another season of Insecure. But Issa Rae, who starred in and created the series, won’t leave fans without any entertainment.

Issa Rae and Jussie Smolett (Empire) will serve as executive producers for a new web series entitled Giants

Steve Harvey Apologizes To Asian American Community After Racist Jokes

During a January 6 episode of The Steve Harvey Show, the comedian found himself continuing a trope that’s long been a part of the comedy genre – emasculating Asian men.

After commenting on a 2002 book entitled How to Date a White Woman: A Practical Guide for Asian Men, the veteran comedian and television host went off on a tangent about a perceived lack of sex appeal in Asian men. 

Steve Harvey Meets With Donald Trump, Internet (Including DL Hughley) Reacts Accordingly

To date, President-Elect Donald Trump’s interaction with Black people has been mostly limited to making vague promises from the safety of rooms full of white faces, painting inner cities as urban dystopias and posing for a few pictures with a couple black celebrities.

Kanye West came under harsh scrutiny for meeting with Trump shortly after being released after the hospital following what’s suspected to be a mental breakdown. The latest Black celeb to make the same mistake and end up in the Internet’s crosshairs after visiting Trump Tower was famed comedian and host Steve Harvey.

Understanding the ‘cultural not remedial’ aspect of Black Vernacular English

“Why don’t you hand in papers in Ebonics since that is how you talk?”

I remember someone asking me this in my early days of grad school. I then explained that, as a student, it was my job to perform particular scholastic duties – including showing a mastery of the traditional APA, MLA, and Chicago Turabian styles of writing.

However, I told him that I use my native tongue – manifested from my years in Oakland, Calif, raised on the music of E-40, Keak Da Sneak and Tony! Toni! Toné!, and on the slang stylings of radio DJs like KMEL’s Chuy Gomez and Sway – in the classroom when I speak because I have no problem being who I am in that space.

But his question made me think about the ways that our use of regional tongues of Black Vernacular English (sometimes referred to as African-American Vernacular English, AAVE, or BVE) is often judged unnecessarily. Not only that, our decisions to use them in particular settings rather than others is often questioned as inauthenticity.

‘Hidden Figures’ Represents Black Women’s Continued Quest For Dignity and Recognition

I remember the first time I had my intelligence questioned by a peer like it was yesterday; I had just won the regional spelling bee when a classmate, a non-Black person of color, started a rumor that my accomplishments were simply a result of me smoking marijuana.

I was 14, and had never smoked a day in my life.

REVIEW: ‘Hidden Figures’ Amplifies Black Female Brilliance and Community

By: Imani J. Jackson

When a movie theatre packed with people of varied races, ethnicities, ages and genders erupts into simultaneous applause and cheers during a film’s closing credits, it’s safe to say the story resonated. That human happiness is exactly what manifested on Saturday when my mother, a grandmotherly elder, my younger sister and I attended a Hidden Figures showing.

Cinematically, Hidden Figures demonstrates creative power and how to sensitively wield it. Theodore Melfi directed the film and co-wrote the script with Allison Schroeder, which is based on the non-fiction book Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly.