Gina Prince-Bythewood becomes first woman of color to direct Marvel superhero film

Gina Prince-Bythewood  is being billed as the first woman of color to ever direct a superhero movie. The director of Love & Basketball and Beyond the Lights and co-creator of the currently popular Shots Fired has been tapped by Marvel to sit in the director’s chair for a film entitled Silver & Black, according to The Verge.

Silver & Black will be an extension of the Marvel Cinematic Universe and focus on two female figures from the Spider-Man mythos – Silver Sable and Black Cat. 

Behind Amy Schumer’s ‘Get Out’ joke: The horrible legacy of claiming the Black phallus endangers white women

By Sherronda Brown

Amy Schumer is racist, and white women love her. The White Feminist icon’s most recent public display of Beckery is yet another demonstration of the sexual racism she so often falls back into, using racist stereotypes benefitting her white womanhood while decrying the sexual proclivities of men of color.

Two weeks ago, when asked about past instances of her own rude behavior in the bedroom in an interview with Andy Cohen on Watch What Happens: Live, Schumer answered: “A guy had an uncircumcised penis and it was too big and I just was like ‘Peace!’ Like, I got out. I got right out of there. I was like, ‘I’m not going to be deformed because I had sex with you once.’ That’s what the movie Get Out should have been about.”

Jury selected for Bill Cosby trial

The jury has been selected for Bill Cosby’s sexual assault trial, which will begin next month in Norristown, Pennsylvania, according to ABC News.

Cosby’s defense team was quick to criticize the make-up of the jury, which is almost split down the middle between men (7) and women (5), but only has two Black jurors. This will surely play into the narrative that Cosby’s being set up because of his status as a prominent Black man. But the selection of this jury is worthy of a closer look.

Miley Cyrus finally announces the end of her minstrel show, proving once and for all the violence of appropriation

By Sherronda Brown

“When I want something, it’s fucking easy for me.” – Miley Cyrus, the self-ordained savior of our nation

The words “Dumpster Fyre” hover above the head of Miley Cyrus on the cover of Billboard Magazine. Even though they refer to the debacle at Fyre Festival in which rich white kids were finessed out of thousands of dollars and found themselves in a trash pile with bologna sandwiches rather than at the lavish resort they were promised, these words are perhaps more fitting for the interview with the 24-year-old.

via Billboard Magazine

Billboard explains that the Disney Alum “has left behind the pasties, hip-hop bangerz and, yes, weed for her new incarnation: countrified singer-songwriter and hopeful unifier of a divided nation.” Standing among waist-high greenery with her hands in her free-flowing hair, Miley dons a simple pink farm girl dress with frilly lace about the sleeves and bodice. The expression on her face is plain and unassuming. Save for the sporadic miniature tattoos peppering the length of her arms, she is a vision of white Southern Belle innocence and propriety.

Franchesca Ramsey gets pilot for late night Comedy Central series

When you look across the late night landscape as it currently stands, you’ll find a lot of white and a lot of men. Despite America being filled with everything but white men, they’re still often treated as the faces of pop culture as they host late night television. Fortunately, Comedy Central is looking to change that.

Franchesca Ramsey, a comedian, writer and host of MTV’s Decoded, will executive produce and host her own late night show for the network, according to NBCBLK.

Wiki Commons

Black Writers Shine As Pulitzer Prize Winners Announced

Some would say that we’re living in a renaissance of Black art. Whether it be in music, painting or literature, black artists seem to be excelling even more than usual. This belief was further supported on Monday as Pulitzer Prize winners were announced. Out of the 21 writers awarded in New York City for their work, four of them – Colson Whitehead, Lynn Nottage, Tyehimba Jess and Hilton Als – were Black.