Kanye West: ‘I would’ve voted for Trump’

Remember when Kanye West said that he was running for president in 2020? Everyone had a laugh and and even made a hashtag out of it. Meanwhile, some of us paused and realized there was no reason to presume he would be running as as a Democrat. Those concerns have been justified.

At a recent concert, the rapper/fashion designer took one of his trademark self-imposed interruptions to let the crowd know what side of the line he fell on in the recent election. The fact that he didn’t actually vote is somehow the relief. 

Black Lives Matter Releases Statement On Election Results

Leaders of the Black Lives Matter Global Network have released an official statement following the results of the election, exclusively through Mic.

The statement calls on how the organization’s mandate and mission has not changed because of President-elect Trump’s victory, which it calls “the election of a white supremacist to the highest office in American government.”

Young adults prefer Clinton on income gap, divide on jobs

By: Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Young adults are more likely to trust Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump on handling wages, income inequality and personal finances, but they’re divided on which candidate would better handle job creation, a new GenForward poll shows.

Young Hispanics, blacks and Asian-Americans favor Clinton on all four economic issues, but young whites are more likely to favor Trump on both job creation and their personal finances.

POLL: Young People Prefer Clinton over Trump, but Don’t Trust Either Candidate

The July 2016 results from the GenForward Survey have some important findings: young people, especially young people of color, prefer Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump. Clinton has a sizable advantage with all young people over Trump, polling at 35% to 19% in a poll that also includes third party candidates Gary Johnson and Jill Stein.

Poll: Most Young Americans Say Parties Don’t Represent Them

By: Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most young Americans say the Republican and Democratic parties don’t represent them, a critical data point after a year of ferocious presidential primaries that forced partisans on both sides to confront what – and whom – they stand for.

That’s according to a new GenForward poll that shows the disconnect holds true across racial and ethnic groups, with just 28 percent of young adults overall saying the two major parties do a good job of representing the American people.

Trump, Clinton, and A Tale Of Two Racisms

Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic nominee for President, is working tirelessly to distance herself from her (former) friend, Republican nominee Donald Trump. Her method in doing so suggests that she is somehow critically different from him. But, young people of color don’t seem to be buying that claim. This begs the question: Why are her supporters struggling to understand this dissonance? Well, it’s likely because many of those in the Clinton camp have a problematic definition of racism and, to a larger extent, systematic oppression in general.

Angela Davis Talks Black Liberation, History and the Contemporary Vision

Fifty years after the founding of the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, the agenda and style of the legendary Black revolutionary organization remains relevant in today’s public discourse. An end to “police brutality and the murder of Black people,” central to the Black Lives Matter movement, was laid out in the Black Panthers’ 10-Point Platform five decades ago. Both acclaim and condemnation erupted when their iconic black berets made an appearance recently in Beyoncé’s half-time show performance during the Super Bowl.

Bernie Sanders and the Exclusionary Legacy of the Far Left

Despite wins in Missouri and Michigan, Bernie Sanders still trails Hillary Clinton by a decisive margin—especially among African-Americans. After competing in 31 primaries, the most Sanders has been able to clench of the Black vote was 29 percent— even with the support of prominent civil rights activist and fellow leftist Cornel West, who contends that “Brother Bernie is better for Black people”. But the long history of anti-Blackness in the American political left may be to blame for Sanders’ inability to earn the trust of the Black community.