Hillary Clinton, former Secretary of State and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, smiles while speaking during a campaign event in Hartford, Connecticut, U.S., on Thursday, April 21, 2016. Tuesday night's New York primary not only ended a multi-state losing streak for current front-runners Donald Trump and Clinton, who won roughly 60 percent of the vote each, but also moved them an important step closer to the general election.

Young adults prefer Clinton on income gap, divide on jobs

By: Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Young adults are more likely to trust Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump on handling wages, income inequality and personal finances, but they’re divided on which candidate would better handle job creation, a new GenForward poll shows.

Young Hispanics, blacks and Asian-Americans favor Clinton on all four economic issues, but young whites are more likely to favor Trump on both job creation and their personal finances.


POLL: Young People Prefer Clinton over Trump, but Don’t Trust Either Candidate

The July 2016 results from the GenForward Survey have some important findings: young people, especially young people of color, prefer Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump. Clinton has a sizable advantage with all young people over Trump, polling at 35% to 19% in a poll that also includes third party candidates Gary Johnson and Jill Stein.

Members of the Secret Service talk to each other as people visit the grounds around the White House May 30, 2016 in Washington, DC. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski

Poll: Most Young Americans Say Parties Don’t Represent Them

By: Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most young Americans say the Republican and Democratic parties don’t represent them, a critical data point after a year of ferocious presidential primaries that forced partisans on both sides to confront what – and whom – they stand for.

That’s according to a new GenForward poll that shows the disconnect holds true across racial and ethnic groups, with just 28 percent of young adults overall saying the two major parties do a good job of representing the American people.


Trump, Clinton, and A Tale Of Two Racisms

Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic nominee for President, is working tirelessly to distance herself from her (former) friend, Republican nominee Donald Trump. Her method in doing so suggests that she is somehow critically different from him. But, young people of color don’t seem to be buying that claim. This begs the question: Why are her supporters struggling to understand this dissonance? Well, it’s likely because many of those in the Clinton camp have a problematic definition of racism and, to a larger extent, systematic oppression in general.


Angela Davis Talks Black Liberation, History and the Contemporary Vision

Fifty years after the founding of the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, the agenda and style of the legendary Black revolutionary organization remains relevant in today’s public discourse. An end to “police brutality and the murder of Black people,” central to the Black Lives Matter movement, was laid out in the Black Panthers’ 10-Point Platform five decades ago. Both acclaim and condemnation erupted when their iconic black berets made an appearance recently in Beyoncé’s half-time show performance during the Super Bowl.

Photo by Warren K. Leffler
Photo by Michael Vadon

Bernie Sanders and the Exclusionary Legacy of the Far Left

Despite wins in Missouri and Michigan, Bernie Sanders still trails Hillary Clinton by a decisive margin—especially among African-Americans. After competing in 31 primaries, the most Sanders has been able to clench of the Black vote was 29 percent— even with the support of prominent civil rights activist and fellow leftist Cornel West, who contends that “Brother Bernie is better for Black people”. But the long history of anti-Blackness in the American political left may be to blame for Sanders’ inability to earn the trust of the Black community.

Obama Roast

President Obama Holds Republican Roast Session During Speech

During a presidential election cycle, it’s common practice for potential candidates on both sides to criticize the sitting head of state to show what they’d do differently. But this cycle in particular has brought out some non-stop claims by Republican candidates that question pretty much every move President Barack Obama has made in his presidency.

Well, Obama isn’t sitting quietly as he’s attacked on a daily basis. Recently, a video surfaced on C-SPAN of Obama taking some time out in a speech to hold an abbreviated roast session of the Republican Party as a whole.


It’s Simple. I Choose Neither Hillary nor Bernie.

The daily routine of watching Bernie Sanders fans hell-bent on bullying people of color on social media and hopelessly loyal Hillary supporters claiming her campaign an intersectional victory has left me feeling even less apt to cast my vote for either candidate in November.

As a young Black, queer woman of middle-class means and working-class roots, I have never been excited by this year’s Democratic presidential hopefuls. Both Clinton and Sanders have shown a keen disinterest in the issues which I care most about like public education reform, the end of mass incarceration, police occupation of Black and Brown communities, and the intentional investment in Black futures. Instead, they have engaged in political rhetoric and performance that holds literally no meaning for me.