Howard University Law School

LinkedIn Names Howard University A Top School For Media Professionals

The college that a student chooses to go to is only half of the battle when it comes to getting a job upon graduation. Another important part is picking the right program at the right school. To help with these sometimes overwhelming decisions, LinkedIn has provided a list of the best undergraduate universities for various career fields.

And as far as job placement for media professionals is concerned, Howard University is considered to be the fourth best in the entire country. Howard is the only HBCU to make the list of 25. 

Alma Adams

Congresswoman Proposes $250 Million HBCU Innovation Fund Act

Rep. Alma S. Adams of the 12th Congressional District of North Carolina proposed a new piece of legislation that would help support historically black colleges and universities for the foreseeable future. Adams spoke to congress and introduced plans for a $250 Million HBCU Innovation Fund Act that will work to supply underfunded schools with financial support through grants, according to the Root.

Reportedly, the money the fund would collect and be responsible for distributing would spark the introduction of programs that would lead to higher recruitment, enrollment and graduation rates as well as bolster the schools’ STEM programs.

Nate Parker

Nate Parker Launches Film Program At Texas HBCU

If Wiley College sounds familiar to you, it may be because you have an encyclopedic knowledge of black history of you’ve watched The Great Debaters, which tells the story of the Texas HBCU’s debate team in the 1930s. Because things are always best when they come full circle, a leading actor from the 2007 film is giving back to the institution.

Nate Parker, who starred in The Great Debaters and directed the upcoming The Birth of a Nation, is helping Wiley College launch a new film and drama program, according to the Root. The Nate Parker School of Film and Drama will admit its first group of students this fall.

T.C. Williams High School

Church Connects HBCUs and High School Students For $2 Million In Scholarships

The Alfred Street Baptist Church in Alexandria, Va. has been helping make education more accessible to black students for decades. It’s most recent method of doing so has been the Annual HBCU College Festival.

The 14th Annual HBCU College Festival was held this past February at T.C. Williams High School and brought in more than 3,000 students from all over the country. By placing students in the same room as representatives of some of the country’s top Historically Black Colleges and Universities, more than 1,000 students were admitted into at least one institution and received more $2.1 million in scholarships, according to the Root.

A reveler flutters a rainbow flag during the Gay Pride Parade in Bogota, Colombia on June 28, 2015. AFP PHOTO / GUILLERMO LEGARIA        (Photo credit should read

Hampton University Approves First LGBTQ Organization

Hampton University brings more diversity to its campus as it welcomes its first LGBTQ organization.

On February 4, 2016, the students at Hampton University heard that the first LGBTQ organization had been approved by administration. It’s called Mosaic, which is an acronym for “Motivating Open-Minded Social Acceptance and Inspiring Change.” This group will be a safe space for queer Hampton University students and allies to come together and promote acceptance, tolerance, and awareness of sexual orientation and gender identity.

Howard University Law School

Howard President Suggests HBCU’s Go Tuition Free Under Obama’s Plan

Howard University President, Dr. Wayne Frederick, recently made a suggestion about something that President Barack Obama can add to his plan to improve higher education.

Obama is looking to make community colleges across the country free to students that maintained good grades while in high school. Frederick wants the President to consider adding HBCU’s under that umbrella, according to NBC4.

9 HBCU Students Are Coming For Tennessee’s Voter-ID-Law

fisk tennessee state

Nine HBCU students have filed a lawsuit against Tennessee’s vote-ID-law.

From The Root:

The voter-ID war just opened up a huge new front. This time in Tennessee. A group of nine students from HBCUs Fisk and Tennessee State have filed a federal lawsuit against the Volunteer State’s heavily contested and controversial voter-ID law.

The suit was filed by the Nashville Student Organizing Committee, a coalition of student activists established in February 2014. The plaintiffs were all disallowed from voting in 2014 because they carried student IDs as identification. NSOC retained the Washington, D.C.-based Fair Elections Legal Network, which then partnered with the local Nashville-based firm Barrett Johnston Martin & Garrison as part of a legal project to restore student voting rights in the state.

The case marks a highly unprecedented turning point in the ongoing conflict over voter ID and other Republican-led voter-suppression laws accused of targeting Democratic-friendly young, minority and low-income voters. With Republicans expanding their electoral gains in state legislatures, voter-ID laws have become a common feature in many key states and, as initial data suggest, disproportionately impacted large populations of color.

Observers are watching the new Tennessee case with heavy interest, since it appears to be the first student-led legal action of its kind. Some view it as Supreme Court-worthy and a savvy political maneuver on the part of black youth activists that could have far-reaching implications beyond Tennessee. The suit may very well advance because the Middle Tennessee federal district court is dominated by judges appointed by Democratic presidents. Chief Judge Kevin Sharp was recently appointed by President Barack Obama.   

Read more at The Root.

 

Photo: Courtesy of Nashville Student Organizing Committee