Oklahoma Politicians Have Voted to Eliminate AP U.S. History

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From Talking Points Memo:

An Oklahoma House committee on Monday approved a bill taking aim at the new AP U.S. History framework, which conservatives have decried as unpatriotic and negative, the Tulsa World reported.

State Rep. Dan Fisher (R) introduced a bill at the beginning of the month that keeps the state from funding AP U.S. History unless the College Board changes the curriculum. The bill also orders the state Department of Education to establish a U.S. History program that would replace the AP course.

Since the College Board released a new course framework for U.S. history in October 2012,conservative backlash against the course has grown significantly. The Republican National Committee condemned the course and its “consistently negative view of American history” in August. Numerous states and school districts have now taken action to denounce the exam.

Fisher said Monday that the AP U.S. History course emphasizes “what is bad about America” and complained that the framework eliminated the concept of “American exceptionalism,”according to the Tulsa World.

Read the entire piece at TPM

Photo: Advanced Placement 

2014 sees a record number of African Americans running for Congress

 

A record number of African Americans are running for federal office this year, and unfortunately their advances have been met with increased racial polarization in politics, especially in the Deep South.

There are 82 black nominees in the two major political parties running in 2014, according to an analysis by David Bositis. The number surpasses the 2012 record of 72 candidates.

Study: despite being political powerhouses, black women remain absent from politics

Despite being one of the most active political constituencies in the nation, black women are severely underrepresented in federal, state and local government.

That’s the conclusion of a study released by The Higher Heights Leadership Fund and the Rutgers University Center for American Women and Politics, in collaboration with the Center for American Progress. 

The report, “Status of Black Women in American Politics,” highlights the extent to which the voices of black women are not be adequately heard, or their concerns addressed.

Two leaders, different styles

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The following post was published in the New York Times. It was written by Peter Baker and Matt Apuzzo. 

By:  Peter Baker and Matt Apuzzo

The two men in open-collar shirts sat facing each other, papers and a BlackBerry strewn on a coffee table, sober looks on both their faces. One leaned forward, gesturing with his left hand, clearly doing the talking. The other sat back in his chair, two fingers pressed to his temple as he listened intently.

When violence erupted last week after a police shooting in Missouri, President Obama and Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. huddled on Martha’s Vineyard where both were on vacation. But as the most powerful African-Americans in the nation confront its enduring racial divide, they come at it from fundamentally different backgrounds and points of view.