Screenshot fron En Pointe Studio's Instagram

This Dance Studio is Breaking the Color Lines and Empowering Dancers of Color

Seven weeks ago, En Pointe Studio, which is located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, made their first post on Instagram, and ever since then, they have dedicated every post to celebrating young Black dance talent. A week ago, they released a photo of all their talented dancers.  En Pointe Studio is shattering the imposed color lines in the dance world, and it is truly inspiring.

Mindy-Project

Why I Wish “The Mindy Project” Was Cancelled

In 2012, when I found out that the Mindy Kaling landed a show, I was ecstatic. At the time, I was still in the Scandal and Nicole Beharie in Sleepy Hollow bliss. When I first started watching Kaling’s show, The Mindy Project, I was willing to ignore some of the jokes that didn’t land or the undeveloped characters because it’s still a struggle for people of color to be represented on television. Now almost four years later, my enthusiasm and dedication for The Mindy Project has disintegrated. I am left wishing that the show was canceled because it doesn’t even try to confront race.

Picture of Abbie Mills from Sleepy Hollow's official Twitter page.

‘Sleepy Hollow’ died along with Abbie Mills

Black lead character Abbie Mills (played by Nicole Beharie) died during Sleepy Hollow’s season three finale last week. As audience members, we learned that just because a show has people of color does not mean that it is people of color friendly.  

Her death was the final blow in the show’s treatment of her character. After her death, we are left to decide what to do with shows that have no respect for their characters of color.

Image by Daderot

Harvard Owned Up to Its Role in Slavery. When Will the Others?

Last week, Harvard University officials announced a plan to create a plaque commemorating slaves who were forced to work on the campus during the 1700s. The Boston-based institution follows in the footsteps of fellow Ivy League member Brown University’s Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice, albeit considerably later. Yet they are far outnumbered by the army of institutions who, Ivy League or not, remain steadfast in their decision to continue operating under the assumptions that their institutions came to be without complicity in American slavery.

Promotional Photo from Shea Moisture's Twitter.

Shea Moisture’s First Commercial Tackles the Implicit Racism of Beauty Aisles

 

 

In their first commercial, Shea Moisture is breaking down the barrier between the “Beauty Aisles” and the “Ethnic Sections” in stores.  While the products that are aimed at white women fill every single beauty aisle with pictures of blonde women smiling, the “ethnic sections” are only allowed to have a few dusty shelves.

The separation of products between “beauty” and “ethnic” is a reflection of the standards of beauty that many people and corporations still believe. Many people don’t believe that women of color can be beautiful. In the new commercial, Shea Moisture shows that women of color (especially Black women) are tired of being told that there is not a place for them in beauty.

This commercial is monumental because it openly discusses the racism that runs rampant in the beauty industry. It proves that products aimed at women of color belong in the “Beauty Aisle” because we are beautiful too.

PC: Twitter

Promotional Twitter picture of "The Hair Tales"

“The Hair Tales” Reminds Us of the Magic of Black Hair

People who don’t understand Black hair want to talk about it without saying anything worth hearing.  

For example, recently, instead of concentrating on filing for bankruptcy, rapper 50 Cent had the time to insult a woman on Instagram because of her natural hair. However, “The Hair Tales”, a video series created by writer and activist, Michaela Angela Davis, fights the stigmas associated with Black hair by letting Black women personally tell their narratives and we couldn’t be happier.