The Scariest Part of ‘Get Out’ Was The Trueness To Life

SPOILERS AHEAD! Don’t @ me.

Over the weekend, Jordan Peele’s thriller Get Out scared audiences all over the nation with that age old American horror: anti-Black racism. The premise is simple enough: a white girl, Rose, brings home her Black boyfriend, Chris, to meet her parents in a wealthy, white suburb in upstate New York.

Why You Can’t Understand Black History Without a Critique of Capitalism

Many of our Black history idols have been immortalized for their work against racism carried out by whites, from the federal government on down. They have been applauded for their magical strengths and abilities to overcome insurmountable odds. Their legacies are contextualized through brief chapters in k-12 history classes, where examples of racism are narrowed down to physical harm and explicit parameters that describe what Black people could and couldn’t do “a long time ago”. As a result, many of us were socialized to understand Black history in a way that has been whitewashed or sanitized. The stories we are fed as young people that immortalized, or mainstreamed, our Black figures of inspiration conveniently left out important details, such as the anti-capitalist leanings of their work.

We are in a time where need the full story of the experiences and perspectives of our ancestors, and we need to reclaim those radical beliefs so that we can create space for true progress not just against racism, but also against capitalism.

“Don’t Be A Bystander”: An Interview With Aaryn Lang On Responding to Racist Attacks [VIDEO]

The current political moment requires that young, socially-savvy people lead on issues of gendered oppression, racism, education inequality, and many other issues facing marginalized groups.

In this way, communication and movement building tie together tightly spreading information that can’t as easily be hidden, white washed, or ignored and creating a digital tool box for justice. Project NIA and The Barnard Center for Research on Women have added a resource to this toolbox, aimed at helping you respond to situations of violence on individual and systemic levels.

A conversation on allyship with one of the masterminds behind the Safety Pin Box

There are a number of things in this world we cannot measure with metrics, time, or money making it difficult to account for their effectiveness or worth – allyship has always been one of those things. When it comes to allies, there are more questions around their purpose and usefulness than there are answers. Enter the Safety Pin Box, countering everything allies thought their role actually was.

The Difference Between Casey Affleck and Nate Parker? Community Accountability.

Award season is officially underway for the arts, and some of our favorite films, television shows, and actors and actresses are finally getting the recognition they deserve. But one film is noticeably missing.

Though initially predicted to be both a box office hit and a strong contender for awards, Nate Parker’s “Birth Of A Nation” fell flat in both areas, most likely because of the college rape scandal Parker was embroiled in as well as his unrepentant attitude concerning the case. However, Casey Affleck (younger brother of Ben Affleck) has already nabbed a Golden Globe nomination for his role in the film “Manchester By The Sea,” despite multiple sexual harrasment allegations.

I Will Not Be Giving Donald Trump a Chance

In the words of the great Maya Angelou, “When someone shows you who they are, believe them; the first time.”

This phrase has continually come back to me throughout President-Elect Donald Trump’s political campaign, as he has affirmed his character, or lack thereof, to me, to the American people, and to the world. Very little surprises me about Trump at this point because from the opening statements of his campaign, he has demonstrated that he has no regard for what is right and only has regard for himself.