Parents of Ohio students claim racism led to expulsion

Parents of black students who once attended school in a Cincinnati, OH, suburb claim that their children were expelled for making rap videos off-campus. The parents of four black students who once attended Colerain High School have filed a lawsuit on behalf of their children. They want the expulsions on their children’s’ records expunged and are seeking punitive damages. The school claims that the students were disciplined for unspecified violations that were committed on campus.

New York police make man rap to avoid arrest

shingles

A Brooklyn man says he had two choices when stopped by the NYPD: to rap for the police officers or to go to jail. 

Quinshon Shingles rhymed about alcohol, b**ches and cannabis, and was warned that if his rap wasn’t “hot” enough, he would be arrested.

From New York Post:

“I felt like they were humiliating me,” said Shingles, whose rap name is “Sauce Da Boss,” to The Post on Tuesday. 

Harvard hip-hop fellowship named after Nas, rapper gives benediction

Nas made his first appearance at Harvard University on Thursday and the rapper wasn’t performing. He was on campus to give his blessing to a new fellowship named in his honor.

The Nasir Jones Hip Hop Fellowship will be awarded to two scholars or artists annually. Recipients will be chosen by a Harvard faculty committee.

From New York Times:

 It is primarily a research fellowship, although Marcyliena Morgan, a professor of African and African American Studies and the founder and director of the Hip-Hop Archive and Research Institute, which will administer the fellowship, said on Friday that fellows could teach courses as well. The application process, she said, has just started.

J. Cole on Colorism: “I might not be as successful as I am now if I was dark skin”

In a recent interview with BET, rapper J. Cole sounded off on a variety of heavy issues, including racial profiling and homophobia in Hip Hop.

One topic of conversation that is seldom discussed in Hip Hop is the issue of colorism.

Cole says his privilege as a lighter-skinned person has probably helped him to get where he is today.