Big Sean’s new video for “Dance (A$$) Remix” is….okay. But Nicki Minaj’s incredibly raunchy guest verse on “Dance (A$$) Remix” is waaaaay better than ok.

Check out the video (NSFW):


Minaj has perfected the art of what I’ll call raunch-rap. In a male-dominated genre, she owns her sexuality; declaring her sexual desires frankly and unapologetically, while mocking the public’s obsession with her body. Her performance is a stroke of subversive genius, and it immediately reminded me of YouTube sensations The Freaky Bois; two young gay rappers that spit the nastiest, sleaziest, freakiest raps you’ve ever heard.

Like Nicki, The Freaky Bois achieve more than just shock and awe with these songs. They’re wielding raunchy rap music like a weapon, forcing the listener to grapple with their sexual identities. You can either deal with it, or listen to something else. No compromises. No apologies.

And I love it.

Here’s just a sample of The Freaky Bois’ work (NSFW):


Drake is clearly the most divisive figure in Hip Hop today.

And I’m trying to figure out why.

Now the easy answer is folks just ain’t feeling his music. But I’m not convinced. I know so many Hip Hop fans that really just don’t like Drake. By that I mean the very idea of Drake. Half white. Canadian. Middle class. Kinda clean-cut. Child actor. Always crooning. And pouting. And emo and shit. He’s almost the exact opposite of what our concept of an emcee has always been.

And that’s what’s so interesting about him. Like it or not, he’s breaking the mold. And he’s winning.

So don’t fight the feeling. And get comfortable.

Because Drake is coming into his own; and he’s about to go to the next level.

And here’s why…

NYPD Falsely Charges Black Man: "I Fried Another Nigger"

The NYPD is at it again.

Audio has surfaced of an NYPD officer bragging about falsely accusing a young, Black male of resisting arrest, and then adding for good measure:

“I fried another nigger.”

According to the Root, the officer stopped the young man as part of the department’s racist “stop and frisk” program. The man had done nothing wrong; when he protested the unnecessary stop and asked for the officer’s badge number, Officer Michael Deragjati promptly arrested him for “resisting arrest.”

The rest of this story is like the best episode of Punk’d I’ve never seen.

Is It Ever OK For White People To Say NIGGER?

In an article released last week for Time Magazine, writer Touré asserts that it’s not OK for white people to use the word nigger (or its crazy cousin, nigga).

Well…he does list some exceptions.

According to Touré, white people can say nigger if they are:

1. Reporting on, commenting on, or writing some kind of think piece involving the word nigger.


 2. Using the word as part of a play, film, song, piece of visual art or stand-up comedy routine.

Is that alright with you?

Maya Rupert's "Is Marriage Equality for White People?"

Should Black people care about marriage equality?

Writer, activist and friend of, Maya Rupert has written a fascinating article for the Huffington Post on this very controversial topic.

We implore you to check it out.

Rupert is the Federal Policy Director at the National Center for Lesbian Rights. In a recent article entitled “Is Marriage Equality for White People,” Rupert condemns the increasingly popular position that marriage equality for LGBT people is a “white issue.”

She writes,

“This narrative is untrue, and it is time we stop acting like marriage equality is only for white people. In fact, the fight for marriage equality is very much a fight about racial justice. Opponents of marriage equality are waging a culture war and, while the LGBT community may be the stated target, families of color are and will continue to be the collateral damage.”

Do you agree?

A Message To Black LBGT Youth On National Coming Out Day

Today is National Coming Out Day; a celebration of the bravery it takes to come out, and the positive impact it can have on the LGBT community at large.

The Black Youth Project wishes our readers a wonderful and liberating Coming Out Day. If you do choose this is to be the day that you reveal your sexuality to family or friends, we want you to know that you have our love and support.

And feel free to send us your “Coming Out” stories. Hearing about your personal journey can make a world of difference to a young, struggling LBGT youth looking for some type of affirmation or hope.

However, we also want to make it very clear that all of us – regardless of age, gender, race or socioeconomic status – are on our own journeys.

Nobody knows the best time for you to come out BUT YOU.

Are Black People Willing To Call Eminem The Greatest Rapper Of All Time?

As a Black person, are you afraid to call Eminem the greatest rapper of all time?

Or perhaps just unwilling.

Me? I’m not so sure.

I don’t think I’m opposed to Slim Shady being the GOAT; he’s just not my choice. Despite what many might assume from some of my prior articles (like this one or that one), Jay-Z has always gotten my vote as the greatest rapper of all time.

But I would never exclude Eminem from the conversation entirely.

Others…not so much.

How Racism Is Destroying America's Political Discourse

A few years ago I had an internship at the Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition, where one of my chief duties was to spend hours looking through microfilm for newspaper clippings that dramatized the racial climate in Philadelphia throughout the years.

One article that stood out was a poll of Philadelphians that asked, “How would you describe the state of racial equality in America today?” The vast majority of whites (something like 60-70%) answered “Good.”

The year was 1968.

These people had no idea how dire the state of race relations was in America at the time because all they could compare it to was a not-so-distant past marred by lynching, sharecropping and segregation. But today we can see quite clearly that things were bad. Racism was alive and well.

And that’s why race is such a tricky issue in America. Racism grows classier and more refined every day, but it never goes away. How else can we explain the American people tolerating the unprecedented disrespect, racism, obstruction and outright legislative terrorism being perpetrated by the GOP?

Why You Should Be Taking Tyler, the Creator and Kreayshawn Seriously

Last Saturday night, Kreayshawn and the White Girl Mob played a sold-out gig in Hollywood. And according to Spin Magazine, it was an insane show.

“…the audience rushed the stage where they proceeded to completely freak out — bouncing, stripping, cooking, and flipping into the crowd — until the music was done and they were forced bodily from the limelight by the venue’s security. It was intensely electric.”

The next day, she hit the VMAs, where she was nominated (and a favorite) for the Best New Artist Award. She lost to like-minded and equally controversial Tyler, the Creator. Like Kreayshawn, Tyler and Odd Future rose to prominence through YouTube, blogs and social media, don’t fit in any radio format, and have sharply divided critics and fans.

A lot of people aren’t taking Kreayshawn and Odd Future seriously. And that’s understandable. When something comes along that is so alien to mainstream standards and tastes, it always gets dismissed.

But don’t be fooled. Their success is organic and real; not some record label’s scheme. The rise of artists like Odd Future and Kreayshawn (as well as Lil B and Waka Flocka Flame) is subversive to Hip Hop’s status quo. And it might end up being a big deal.