Shea Moisture’s First Commercial Tackles the Implicit Racism of Beauty Aisles

 

 

In their first commercial, Shea Moisture is breaking down the barrier between the “Beauty Aisles” and the “Ethnic Sections” in stores.  While the products that are aimed at white women fill every single beauty aisle with pictures of blonde women smiling, the “ethnic sections” are only allowed to have a few dusty shelves.

The separation of products between “beauty” and “ethnic” is a reflection of the standards of beauty that many people and corporations still believe. Many people don’t believe that women of color can be beautiful. In the new commercial, Shea Moisture shows that women of color (especially Black women) are tired of being told that there is not a place for them in beauty.

This commercial is monumental because it openly discusses the racism that runs rampant in the beauty industry. It proves that products aimed at women of color belong in the “Beauty Aisle” because we are beautiful too.

PC: Twitter

#UnfairandLovely is A Stand Against Colorism

In most cultures that have been affected by white supremacy, there are white standards of beauty in place to tell women that they are not beautiful enough to be loved or wanted in their society. Unfortunately, when beauty is based solely on European standards, a woman’s physical and mental potential is not related to a her intelligence. Instead, this logic suggests that the whiter she is, then the prettier and more successful she will be.  However with hashtag #UnfairandLovely, South Asian women are taking a stand against this system of oppression called colorism. This hashtag is important because it raises much needed awareness of the discrimination that women face because of their darker complexions.

‘The Wiz Live!’ gives us the representation we need

Forty years later, the creative retelling of  the 1975 Broadway musical The Wiz was revitalized when the The Wiz Live! aired on NBC on December 3rd. While watching, it wasn’t hard to connect with the familiar songs like “Ease on Down the Road” and “Home.” The live musical kept the same soul and excitement that made The Wiz a classic. However, The Wiz Live! added some flare the past adaptations did not have. There were ipads, dabs, superfly munchkins, vogueing in the Emerald City, but most importantly Dorothy, our all American girl, had natural hair. In essence, this new production gave us the prime time representation we have been waiting for.

Viola Davis describes as being ‘less than classically beautiful,’ black women defend star

 

 

A highly criticized New York Times article published last week really offended a few black women. In her op-ed, Alessandra Stanley described actress Viola Davis — star of Shonda Rhimes’ new ABC show “How To Get Away With Murder”— as “less than classically beautiful.”

Viola Davis had a few choice words for Stanley, saying  “You may shoot me with your words, you may cut me with your eyes, you may kill me with your hatefulness, But still, like air, I’ll rise!!!”

She wasn’t the only one who criticized Stanley. Black women from across the nation took to social media in defense of Davis by launching a beautiful  online campaign in celebration of black beauty. 

Lupita Nyong’o says dark complexion was an ‘obstacle’ during her youth

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Lupita Nyong’o delivered a tear-filled speech as she accepted an award at Essence magazine’s seventh annual Women in Hollywood luncheon.

The 30-year-old star has been receiving a wave of attention for her astonishing role in the critically-acclaimed film 12 Years a Slave. During her speech, Nyong’o made a confession that many dark skinned women can attest to. 

Viola Davis: ‘I have never felt pretty’

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Since her Oscar-nominated performance in “The Help,” Viola Davis has pretty much become a household name. Despite fame and success, the star opened up about her battles with self-esteem.

“I have never felt pretty,” she said during a lunch interview with Essence. 

 From The Grio:

Davis described a childhood of poverty and abuse, combined with being in the only black family in her community. People in her neighborhood used profanity to describe her to her face. She internalized these messages. “In fact, I embraced being ugly,” the actress said. But, rather than let such perceptions destroy her sense of hope (“Without hope, I would be dead,” she said), the thespian chose to work on her inner strengths.

J. Cole on Colorism: “I might not be as successful as I am now if I was dark skin”

In a recent interview with BET, rapper J. Cole sounded off on a variety of heavy issues, including racial profiling and homophobia in Hip Hop.

One topic of conversation that is seldom discussed in Hip Hop is the issue of colorism.

Cole says his privilege as a lighter-skinned person has probably helped him to get where he is today.